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Dynamic dexterity of a planar 2-DOF parallel manipulator in a hybrid machine tool

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2008

Jun Wu
Affiliation:
Institute of Manufacturing Engineering, Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China.
Jinsong Wang
Affiliation:
Institute of Manufacturing Engineering, Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China.
Tiemin Li
Affiliation:
Institute of Manufacturing Engineering, Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China.
Liping Wang
Affiliation:
Institute of Manufacturing Engineering, Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China.
Liwen Guan
Affiliation:
Institute of Manufacturing Engineering, Department of Precision Instruments and Mechanology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P. R. China.
Corresponding

Summary

This paper addresses the dynamic dexterity of a planar 2-degree of freedom (DOF) parallel manipulator with virtual constraint. Without simplification, the dynamic formulation is derived by using the virtual work principle. The condition number of the inertia matrix of the dynamic equation is presented as a criterion to evaluate the dynamic dexterity of a manipulator. In order to obtain the best isotropic configuration of the dynamic dexterity in the whole workspace, two global performance indices, which consider the mean value and standard deviation of the condition number of the inertia matrix, respectively, are proposed as the objective function. For a given set of geometrical and inertial parameters, the dynamic dexterity of the parallel manipulator is more isotropic in the center than at the boundaries of the workspace.

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Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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