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A control architecture for a mobile heavy-lift precision manipulator with limited sensory information

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2007

William Becker
Affiliation:
Mechanical Engineering Field and Space Robotics Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 3–469, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 02139, Cambridge, MA, USA
Matthew DiCicco
Affiliation:
Mechanical Engineering Field and Space Robotics Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 3–469, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 02139, Cambridge, MA, USA
Justin Garretson
Affiliation:
Mechanical Engineering Field and Space Robotics Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 3–469, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 02139, Cambridge, MA, USA
Steven Dubowsky
Affiliation:
Mechanical Engineering Field and Space Robotics Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Room 3–469, 77 Massachusetts Ave., 02139, Cambridge, MA, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

Mobile robotic manipulators can augment the strength and dexterity of human operators in unstructured environments. Here, the control system for a six degree-of-freedom heavy-lift mobile manipulator for lifting and inserting payloads on the deck of a ship is described. The robotic hardware and the application present several control challenges, including structural resonances, high joint friction that varies with time, limited sensors for measuring the joint friction, complex interaction with the environment, tight tolerances for the insertion tasks, lack of bilateral force feedback of the contact forces, and ship motions. The control system enables an operator to perform insertion tasks using feedback of tactile clues of the manipulator position, and reduces the effects of friction with a combination of sensor-based, adaptive, and model-based methods of friction compensation. The control architecture is validated in simulation and on a laboratory manipulator.

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Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2007

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