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Anthropomorphic robotic arm with integrated elastic joints for TCM remedial massage

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2014

Yuancan Huang
Affiliation:
Bionic Robot and System Key Laboratory, School of Mechatronical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100081, China CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse, France, and Univ de Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse, France
Jian Li
Affiliation:
Bionic Robot and System Key Laboratory, School of Mechatronical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100081, China
Qiang Huang
Affiliation:
Bionic Robot and System Key Laboratory, School of Mechatronical Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, 5 South Zhongguancun Street, Haidian District, Beijing 100081, China
Philippe Souères
Affiliation:
CNRS, LAAS, 7 Avenue du colonel Roche, F-31400 Toulouse, France, and Univ de Toulouse, LAAS, F-31400 Toulouse, France
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Summary

For reproducing the manipulation of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) remedial massage and meanwhile guaranteeing safety, a 4-degree-of-freedom anthropomorphic robotic arm with integrated elastic joints is developed, and a passivity-based impedance control is used. Due to the series elasticity, integrated joints may minimize large forces that occur during accidental impacts, and, further, may offer more accurate and stable force control and a capacity for energy storage. Human expert's fingertip force curve in the process of massage therapy is acquired in vivo by a dedicated measurement device. Then three massage techniques, pressing, kneading, and plucking, are implemented by the soft arm, respectively, on torso model in vitro and on human body in vivo. Experimental results show that the developed robotic arm can effectively replicate the TCM remedial massage techniques.

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Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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