Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7f7b94f6bd-lv2sk Total loading time: 0.501 Render date: 2022-06-29T14:23:53.085Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Women Writing/Women Written: The Case of Oriental Women in English Colonial Fiction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 March 2016

Hager Ben Driss*
Affiliation:
Kairouan University, Tunisia

Extract

Women's contribution to the building of the british empire has become by now undeniable. Standing at different vantagepoints, English women articulated, supported, and even innovated the colonial discourse. Though highly masculine in its ideological core, the Empire is far from being exclusively male in its rhetorical voice. Feminist postcolonial critics have shown British women's important participation in colonialism. McClintock, for example, claims that “white women were not the hapless onlookers of empire but were ambiguously complicit both as colonizers, privileged and restricted, acted upon and acting” (6).

Type
Essays
Copyright
Copyright © Middle East Studies Association of North America 2001

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Alloula, Malek. The Colonial Harem. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1986.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Azim, Ferdous. The Colonial Rise of the Novel. London: Penguin Books, 1993.Google Scholar
Barthes, Roland. The Pleasure of the Text. Trans. Richard Miller. New York: Hill and Wang, 1975.Google Scholar
Boehmer, Elleke. Colonial and Postcolonial Literature. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Brontë, Charlotte. Jane, Eyre. 1847. London: Macmillan Students’ Novels, 1982.Google Scholar
Brown, Laura. “Amazons and Africans: Gender, Race, and Empire in Daniel Defoe.” Women, “Race” and Writing in the Early Modern Period. Eds. Margo, Hendricks and Patricia, Parker. London: Routledge, 1994. 119–37.Google Scholar
Buchan, John. The Three Hostages. 1924. London: Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd., 1952.Google Scholar
Burton, Antoinette M. “The White Woman’s Burden: British Feminists and the Indian Woman, 1865–1915.” Women’s Studies International Forum 13.4 (1992): 137–57. [Special issue: Western Women and Imperialism.] Ed.Google ScholarGoogle Scholar
Cixous, Hélène. “Castration or Decapitation?.” Trans. Annette Kuhn. Signs 7.1 (1981): 3640.Google Scholar
Defoe, Daniel. Roxana, . 1724. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983.Google Scholar
Deidre, David. Rule Britannia: Women, Empire, and Victorian Writing. New York: Cornell University Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Diver, Maud. Lilamani. 1910. London: William Blackwood & Sons Ltd., 1935.Google Scholar
Diver, Maud. The Lonely Furrow. 1940. London: William Blackwook & Sons Ltd., 1940.Google Scholar
Diver, Maud.The Singer Passes. 1931. London: William Blackwood & Sons Ltd., 1934.Google Scholar
Gilbert, Sandra M., and Susan, Gubar. The Mad Woman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth Century Literary Imagination. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Glyn, Elenor. Three Weeks. 1907. London: Gerald Duckworth & Co. Ltd., 1974.Google Scholar
Greer, Germaine. The Female Eunuch. 1970. London: Granada, 1981.Google Scholar
Haggard, Rider. The Holy Flower. London: Ward, Lock & Co. Ltd., 1920.Google Scholar
Harper, Mary. “Recovering the Other: Women and the Orient in the Writings of Early Nineteenth Century France.” Critical Matrix 1.3 (1985): 1–31.Google Scholar
Hull, E. M. The Sheik. 1919. London: Virago Press Ltd., 1996.Google Scholar
Kabbani, Rana. Imperial Fictions: Europe’s Myths of the Orient. London: Pandora, 1986.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keating, Peter. The Haunted Study: A Social History of the Enlgish Novel, 1875–1914.London; Fontana Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Lewis, Darby. Nudes From Nowhere: Utopian Sexual Landscapes. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2000.Google Scholar
Lewis, Reina, Gendering Orientalism: Race, Feminity and Representation. London: Routledge, 1995.Google Scholar
Linton, Eliza Lynn. “The Wild Women as Politicians.” The Nineteenth Century 30 Oct. (1891): 596605.Google Scholar
McClintock, Anne. Imperial Leather: Race, Gender and Sexuality in the Colonial Context.London: Routledge, 1995.Google Scholar
Melman, Billie. Women's Orients: English Women and the Middle East, 1718–1918. Sexuality, Religion and Work. London: Macmillan, 1992.Google Scholar
Miller, Jane Elridge. Rebel Women: Feminism, Modernism and the Edwardian Novel. London: Virago, 1994.Google Scholar
Ouida, (Marie Louise de La Ramee). Under Two Flags. 1867. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Parry, Benita. Delusions and Discoveries: Studies on India in the British Imagination, 1800–1940. London: Penguin Press, 1972.Google Scholar
Patwardhan, Daya. A Star of India: Flora Annie Steel, Her Works and Times. India: A. V.Grika Prahashan, Poona 2, 1963.Google Scholar
Rajan, Rajeswari Sunder. Real and Imagined Women: Gender, Culture and Postcolonialism. London: Routledge, 1993.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sartre, Jean–Paul. “Writing, Reading and the Public.” Literature in the Modern World. Ed.Walder Dennis. New York: Oxford University Press, 1984.Google Scholar
Schreiner, Olive. The Story of an African Farm. 1883. London: T. Fisher Unwin Ltd., 1924.Google Scholar
Scott, Rebecca. The Fabrication of the Late–Victorian Femme Fatale: The Kiss of Death.London: Macmillan Press Ltd., 1992.Google Scholar
Shakespeare, William. The Tempest. 1623. London: Methuen, 1986.Google Scholar
Showalter, Elaine. Sexual Anarchy: Gender and Culture in the Fin de Siècle. London: Bloomsbury, 1990.Google Scholar
Spivak, Gayatri Chakravorty. “Three Women's Texts and a Critique of Imperialism.” Postcolonial Criticism. Eds. Bart, Moore-Gilbert, Gareth, Stanton and Willy, Maley. London: Longman, 1997, pp. 145–65.Google Scholar
Steel, Flora Annie. The Hosts of the Lord. London: William Heinman, 1900.Google Scholar
Wollstonecraft, Mary. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. 1792. London: J. M. Dent and Sons Ltd, 1988.Google Scholar
Woolf, Virginia. “To Cambridge Women.” Literature in the Modern World. Ed. Dennis, Walder. New York: Oxford University Press, 1990.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Women Writing/Women Written: The Case of Oriental Women in English Colonial Fiction
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Women Writing/Women Written: The Case of Oriental Women in English Colonial Fiction
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Women Writing/Women Written: The Case of Oriental Women in English Colonial Fiction
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *