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International studies at the school level: the findings of recent British research*

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 October 2009

Derek Heater
Affiliation:
Head of Department of History, Brighton College of Education

Extract

The process of education, for all its centrality to the civilized mode of living, is but imperfectly understood. Yet if teaching is to be efficient, the preconditions for and means of learning must assuredly be appreciated; and to this end educationists have started to unravel the awesome complexities of how learning takes place – philosophers identifying the different forms of knowledge, the psychologists the different mental activities involved and the sociologists the different contexts in which learning can take place. As a consequence revolutionary changes have been effected in the syllabus-content and teaching methods of, for example, mathematics and the sciences. However, the amount of research effort that has been deployed on the various traditional school subjects varies considerably. But even the task of surveying an established school subject most patchily investigated would be more straightforward than an examination of the work carried out in the field of international studies.

Type
Review Articles
Copyright
Copyright © British International Studies Association 1976

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References

page 84 note 1 See Morrison, A. and Mclntyre, D., Schools and Socialisation (Penguin Books, Harmonds worth, 1971)Google Scholar; also J. and Wright, D., The Changing World in the Classroom, U.K. Commission for UNESCO (London, 1974).Google Scholar

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page 86 note 1 Ibid. p. 70.

page 86 note 2 Ibid. p. 79.

page 86 note 3 Jahoda, G., ‘Development of Children's Ideas about Country and Nationality’, British Journal of Educational Psychology, xxxiii (1963).Google Scholar

page 86 note 4 Ibid, p. 152.

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page 89 note 3 Mercer, G., ‘Political Learning and Political Education’, unpublished Ph.D. thesis,. University of Strathclyde (1971)Google Scholar; see also ‘Formal Political Education and the Perception of International Conflict’, Journal of Moral Education, iv (1974).

page 89 note 4 ’Political Learning and Political Education’, op. cit. p. 101.

page 90 note 1 ’The Relationship between Children's Preferences for and Knowledge about Other Nations’, op. cit.

page 90 note 2 Lister, I., ‘Political Socialisation and Schools, with special reference to the Knowledge of Political Concepts of English Sixth Formers’, Teaching Politics, ii (1973), p. 16.Google Scholar

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page 90 note 5 ’Political Learning and Political Education’, op. cit. ch. v.

page 91 note 1 N. Johnson et al., ‘The Relationship between Children's Preferences for and Knowledge about Other Nations’, op. cit. p. 35.

page 91 note 2 Silva, W. A. de, ‘Concept Formation in Adolescence through Contextual Clues, with special reference to History material’, unpublished Ph.D. thesis. University of Birmingham (1969)Google Scholar; Hallam, R. N., ‘An Investigation into Some Aspects of the Historical Thinking of Children and Adolescents’, unpublished M.Ed, thesis, University of Leeds (1966)Google Scholar; Wood, D. M., ‘The Development of Some Concepts of Social Relations in Childhood and Adolescence Investigated by means ofthe Analysis of Ten Definitions’, unpublished M.Ed, thesis, University of Nottingham, 1964.Google Scholar

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page 92 note 1 ’Attitudes of Children to International Affairs’, op. cit. p. 201.

page 92 note 2 Op. cit. p. 156.

page 92 note 3 ’Political Learning and Political Education’, op. cit.

page 92 note 4 ’Children and Foreigners’, op. cit. p. 9.

page 93 note 1 Himmelweit, H.et al., Television and the Child (Oxford, 1958).Google Scholar

page 93 note 2 Ibid. pp. 255, 272–3.

page 93 note 3 Johnson, N., ‘Children's Comics’, New Society, viii (1966), p. 12.Google Scholar

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page 94 note 1 Op. cit. pp. 7–8.

page 94 note 2 Brennan, T., ‘Teaching for International Understanding in a Secondary Modern School’, Researches and Studies, no. 21 (1961), p. 36.Google Scholar

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page 94 note 4 ’Political Learning and Political Education’, op. cit. p. 73.

page 94 note 5 ’Attitudes of Children to International Affairs’, op. cit. p. 201.

page 94 note 6 James, H. E. Q. and Tenen, C., ‘Attitudes towards Other People’, International Social Science Bulletin, iii (1951).Google Scholar

page 94 note 7 ’The Contribution of School Geography to the Improvement of International Understanding’, op. cit.

page 94 note 8 Ingram, D., ‘A Study of the School's Role in Attitude Formation and Change with particular reference to International Understanding’, unpublished M.A. thesis, University of London (1972).Google Scholar

page 94 note 9 Williams, H. M., ‘Changes in Pupils' Attitudes towards West African Negroes following the use of two different teaching methods’, British Journal of Educational Psychology, xxxi.Google Scholar

page 94 note 10 Op. cit. pp. 157–8.

page 94 note 11 Op. cii.

page 95 note 1 Morrison, A., ‘The Teaching of International Affairs in Secondary Schools in Scotland’, MOST, no. 2 (1973), p. 10.Google Scholar

page 96 note 1 Op. cit. pp. 45–48.

page 96 note 2 Burton, J. W., World Society (Cambridge, 1972), p. x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

page 96 note 3 This approach is being used in the area of political education. See, for example, Tomlinson, P., ‘Political Education: Cognitive Developmental Perspectives from Moral Education’, unpublished mimeograph, University of York (1975).Google Scholar

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