Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-jcfbx Total loading time: 0.169 Render date: 2022-01-24T00:08:40.503Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Uterine gene therapy and implantation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 March 2000

A M SHARKEY
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Level 2, Rosie Maternity Hospital, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 2SW, UK
Get access

Abstract

The endometrium undergoes cyclical changes under the influence of ovarian steroids, resulting in a tissue receptive to embryo implantation. These changes involve complex interactions between stromal cells, overlying epithelium, blood vessels and the embryo itself. For many women endometrial dysfunction is the source of considerable ill health, causing menstrual problems, pain and infertility. As the use of fertility control has become more widespread across the world, regular menstruation is the norm and abnormalities of menstruation have increased in consequence. Hormone treatments have had limited success in treating these longstanding problems, and new approaches to modulating endometrial functions such as menstruation and implantation (including contraceptives) are needed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2000 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Uterine gene therapy and implantation
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Uterine gene therapy and implantation
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Uterine gene therapy and implantation
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *