Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-fmrbl Total loading time: 0.254 Render date: 2022-09-29T09:05:37.780Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": false, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Anabaptist two kingdom dualism: metaphysical grounding for non-violence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 May 2021

Caleb Zimmerman*
Affiliation:
Department of Philosophy, Temple University, 1801 N Broad St, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 19122, USA

Abstract

A non-violent position drawn from the Anabaptist tradition (‘two-kingdom dualism’) is contrasted with the Christian pacifism with which that position is commonly conflated. It is argued that two-kingdom dualism more effectively leverages the philosophical and practical features of its particularly Christian character than does Christian pacifism – and that these features may have implications beyond the philosophy of religion.

Type
Original Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Augustine (1998) The City of God Against the Pagans. Dyson RW (tr.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Arnold, J (2018) State Violence and Moral Horror. New York, NY: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar
Chignell, A (2007) Belief in Kant. The Philosophical Review 116, 323360.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Curtis-Wendlandt, L (2012) No right to resist? Elise Reimarus's ‘Freedom’ as a Kantian response to the problem of violent revolt. Hypatia 27, 755773.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Estep, W (1995) The Anabaptist Story. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.Google Scholar
Harris, S (2005) The End of Faith: Religion, Terror, and the Future of Reason. New York, NY: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar
Haslanger, S (2012) Resisting Reality: Social Construction and Social Critique. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hill, T (1997) A Kantian perspective on nonviolence. The Journal of Ethics 1, 105140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holmes, RL (1973) The concept of violence in moral and political affairs. Social Theory and Practice 2, 387408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hunter, JD (2010) To Change the World. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kant, I (1999) Critique of Pure Reason. Guyer, P and Wood, AW (trs). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Kierkegaard, S (1983) The Sickness unto Death. Hong, HV and Hong, EH (trs). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Kierkegaard, S (1985) Philosophical Fragments. Hong, HV and Hong, EH (trs). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Kierkegaard, S (1992) Concluding Unscientific Postscript to the Philosophical Fragments. Hong, HV and Hong, EH (trs). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Kierkegaard, S (1997) Without Authority. Hong, HV and Hong, EH (trs). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Mackie, JL (1977) Ethics: Inventing Right and Wrong. New York, NY: Penguin.Google Scholar
McTaggart, JME (1927) The Nature of Existence. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Nietzsche, F (1996) On the Genealogy of Morals. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Sattler, M (1945) The Schleitheim Confession of Faith, 1527. Wenger JC (tr.). The Mennonite Quarterly Review 19, 247253.Google Scholar
Showalter, J (2000) Peace, justice, and simplicity. Lecture. Ministers Fellowship. Grantsville, MD.Google Scholar
Tolstoy, L (2009) The Kingdom of God Is Within You. Garnett C (tr.). Portland, OR: The Floating Press.Google Scholar
Turner, J (2005) Performing conscience: Thoreau, political action, and the plea for John Brown. Political Theory 33, 448471.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Bragt, T (2010) Martyr's Mirror. Harrisonburg, VA: Herald Press.Google Scholar
Weaver, A (2017) Humility, peacebuilding, and the limits of Christian pacifism. The Conrad Grebel Review 35, 240248.Google Scholar
White, S (2017) On the moral objection to coercion. Philosophy and Public Affairs 43, 199231.10.1111/papa.12098CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Whitworth, A (2014) A problem deeper than politics. Mennonite Central Committee. Available at mcc.org/stories/problem-deeper-politics.Google Scholar
Wolff, RP (1969) On violence. Journal of Philosophy 66, 601616.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wolfsdorf, DC (2019) On Goodness. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yoder, JH (1972) The Politics of Jesus. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Anabaptist two kingdom dualism: metaphysical grounding for non-violence
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Anabaptist two kingdom dualism: metaphysical grounding for non-violence
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Anabaptist two kingdom dualism: metaphysical grounding for non-violence
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *