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Isotopic Fractionation of Oxygen and Carbon in Lime Mortar Under Natural Environmental Conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2016

Mark J Y van Strydonck
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Cultural Heritage, Brussels, Belgium
Michel Dupas
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Cultural Heritage, Brussels, Belgium
Edward Keppens
Affiliation:
Royal Institute of Cultural Heritage, Brussels, Belgium
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Abstract

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The rate of calcite formation and the isotopic fractionation in lime mortar during the process of mortar setting were examined. The diffusion rate of atmospheric CO2 in the sample is the rate-controlling step of the chemical reaction. A Rayleigh diffusion in the mortar causes an enrichment of 13C and 18O in the samples.

Type
II. Carbon Cycle in the Environment
Copyright
Copyright © The American Journal of Science 

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