Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-65dc7cd545-srjzm Total loading time: 0.375 Render date: 2021-07-24T13:04:42.754Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Atmospheric 14C Variability Recorded in Tree Rings from Peninsular India: Implications for Fossil Fuel CO2 Emission and Atmospheric Transport

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 July 2016

Supriyo Chakraborty
Affiliation:
Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, 53 University Road, Lucknow 226007, India
Koushik Dutta
Affiliation:
AMS Radiocarbon Laboratory, Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005, India Department of Botany, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA
Amalava Bhattacharyya
Affiliation:
Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, 53 University Road, Lucknow 226007, India
Mohit Nigam
Affiliation:
Center for Applied Isotope Studies, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA
Edward A G Schuur
Affiliation:
Department of Botany, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA
Santosh K Shah
Affiliation:
Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, 53 University Road, Lucknow 226007, India
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Radiocarbon analysis in annual rings of a teak tree (Tectona grandis) is reported in comparison with previously published results. Samples (disks) were collected from Hoshangabad (22°30′N, 78°E), Madhya Pradesh, in central India. The previously published sample was collected from Thane (19°12′N, 73°E), Maharashtra, near the west coast of India (Chakraborty et al. 1994). Two short Δ14C time series were reconstructed with these tree samples to capture the bomb peak of atmospheric 14C and the spatial variability in this record. These time series represent the periods 1954–1977 and 1959–1980 for Hoshangabad and Thane, respectively. The 14C peaks in these places appear around 1964–1965. The Hoshangabad tree records a peak Δ14C value of 708 ± 8%, which conforms to the peak value of Northern Hemisphere Zone 3 as described in Hua and Barbetti (2004). But the peak Δ14C at Thane is somewhat less (630 ± 8%) probably due to the dilution by fossil fuel CO2 free of 14C emanating from the neighboring industrial areas. This depletion of peak values has been used to estimate the local emission of fossil fuel CO2, which is approximately 2.3% of the background atmospheric CO2 concentration.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona 

References

Agrawal, DP, Kusumgar, S. 1968. Tata Institute radiocarbon date list V. Radiocarbon 10(1):131–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bhattacharya, SK, Jani, RA, Borole, DV, Francey, RJ, Allison, CE, Steele, LP, Masarie, KA. 2002. Monsoon signatures in trace gas records from Cape Rama, India. In: Isotope aided studies of atmospheric carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases – phase II. IAEA-TECDOC-1269. Vienna: International Atomic Energy Agency, p 8190.Google Scholar
Bhattacharyya, A, Yadav, RR. 1999. Climatic reconstructions using tree-ring data from tropical and temperate regions of India - a review. IAWA Journal 20(3):311–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bhattacharyya, A, Yadav, RR, Borgaonkar, HP, Pant, GB. 1992. Growth-ring analysis of Indian tropical trees: dendroclimatic potential. Current Science 62(11):736–41.Google Scholar
Bhushan, R, Chakraborty, S, Krishnaswami, S. 1994. Physical Research Laboratory (Chemistry) radiocarbon date list I. Radiocarbon 36(2):251–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bhushan, R, Krishnaswami, S, Somayajulu, BLK. 1997. 14C in air over the Arabian Sea. Current Science 73(3):273–6.Google Scholar
Borgaonkar, HP, Pant, GB, Rupa Kumar, K. 1994. Dendroclimatic reconstruction of summer precipitation at Srinagar, Kashmir, India, since the late-eighteenth century. The Holocene 4(3):299306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Borgaonkar, HP, Pant, GB, Rupa Kumar, K. 1996. Ring-width variation in Cedrus deodara and its climatic response over the Western Himalaya. International Journal of Climatology 16(12):1409–22.3.0.CO;2-H>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Broecker, WS, Peng, T-H, Ostlund, G, Stuiver, M. 1985. The distribution of bomb 14C in the ocean. Journal of Geophysical Research 90(C4):6953–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cain, WF, Suess, HE. 1976. Carbon 14 in tree rings. Journal of Geophysical Research 81(21):3688–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chakraborty, S, Ramesh, R, Krishnaswami, S. 1994. Air-sea exchange of CO2 in the Gulf of Kutch, northern Arabian Sea based on bomb-carbon in corals and tree rings. Proceedings of Indian Academy of Science (Earth and Planetary Science) 103(2):329–40.Google Scholar
Champion, HG, Seth, SK. 1968. A Revised Survey of the Forest Types of India. Delhi: Manager of Publications, Government of India. 404 p.Google Scholar
Chowdhury, KA. 1940. The formation of growth rings in Indian trees-I. Indian Forest Records 1:139.Google Scholar
Damon, PE, Burr, GS, Peristykh, A. 1999. Δ14C and Ekman transport, spiral and west coast upwelling. In: Storohmaier, B, compiler. Abstracts, 8th International Conference on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, 6–10 September 1999, Vienna, Austria, p 101.Google Scholar
de Jong, AFM, Mook, WG. 1982. An anomalous Suess effect above Europe. Nature 298(5875):641–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Draxler, RR, Rolph, GD. 2003. HYSPLIT (HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory) model. (Access via NOAA ARL READY Web site: http://ww.arl.noaa.gov/ready/hysplit4.html). Silver Google Scholar
Spring: NOAA Air Resources Laboratory.Google Scholar
Dutta, K, Bhushan, R, Somayajulu, BLK, Rastogi, N. 2006. Inter-annual variation in atmospheric Δ14C over the Northern Indian Ocean. Atmospheric Environment 40(24):4501–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Guilderson, TP, Caldeira, K, Duffy, PB. 2000. Radiocarbon as a diagnostic tracer in ocean and carbon cycle modeling. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 14(3):887902.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harrison, KG, Broecker, WS, Bonani, G. 1993. The effect of changing land use on soil radiocarbon. Science 262(5134):725–6.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hsueh, DY, Krakauer, NY, Randerson, JT, Xu, X, Trumbore, SE, Southon, JR. 2007. Regional patterns of radiocarbon and fossil fuel-derived CO2 in surface air across North America. Geophysical Research Letters 34: L02816, doi:10.1029/2006GL027032.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hua, Q, Barbetti, M. 2004. Review of tropospheric bomb 14C data for carbon cycle modeling and age calibration purposes. Radiocarbon 46(3):1273–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hua, Q, Barbetti, M. 2007. Influence of atmospheric circulation on regional 14CO2 differences. Journal of Geophysical Research 112: D19102, doi:10.1029/2006JD007898.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hua, Q, Barbetti, M, Worbes, M, Head, J, Levchenko, VA. 1999. Review of radiocarbon data from atmospheric and tree-ring samples for the period AD 1945–1997. IAWA Journal 20(3):261–83.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hua, Q, Barbetti, M, Jacobsen, GE, Zoppi, U, Lawson, EM. 2000. Bomb radiocarbon in annual tree rings from Thailand and Australia. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 172(1–4):359–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hua, Q, Barbetti, M, Zoppi, U, Chapman, DM, Thomson, B. 2003. Bomb radiocarbon in tree rings from northern New South Wales, Australia: implications for dendrochronology, atmospheric transport, and air-sea exchange of CO2 . Radiocarbon 45(3):431–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Keeling, CD, Piper, SC, Bacastow, RB, Wahlen, M, Whorf, TP, Heimann, M, Meijer, HA. 2001. Exchanges of atmospheric CO2 and 13CO2 with the terrestrial biosphere and oceans from 1978 to 2000. I. Global aspects. SIO reference No. 01–06 (revised from SIO reference no. 00–21), June 2001. La Jolla: Scripps Institute of Oceanography.Google Scholar
Kikata, Y, Yonenobu, H, Morishita, F, Hattori, Y. 1992. 14C concentrations in tree stems. Bulletin of the Nagoya University Furukawa Museum 8:41–6. In Japanese.Google Scholar
Land, C, Feichter, J, Sausen, R. 2002. Impact of vertical resolution on the transport of passive tracers in the ECHAM4 model. Tellus B 54(4):344–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leavitt, SW, Donahue, DJ, Long, A. 1982. Charcoal production from wood and cellulose: implications to radiocarbon dates and accelerator target production. Radiocarbon 24(1):2735.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levin, I, Kromer, B. 1997. Twenty years of atmospheric 14CO2 observations at Schauinsland station, Germany. Radiocarbon 39(2):205–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levin, I, Schuchard, J, Kromer, B, Münnich, KO. 1989. The continental European Suess effect. Radiocarbon 31(3):431–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Levin, I, Kromer, B, Schmidt, M, Sartorius, H. 2003. A novel approach for independent budgeting of fossil fuel CO2 over Europe by 14CO2 observations. Geophysical Research Utters 30(23):2194, doi:10.1029/2003GL018477.Google Scholar
Manning, MR, Lowe, DC, Melhuish, WH, Sparks, RJ, Wallace, G, Brenninkmeijer, CAM, McGill, RC. 1990. The use of 14C measurements in atmospheric studies. Radiocarbon 32(1):3758.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Murphy, JO, Lawson, EM, Fink, D, Hotchkis, MAC, Hua, Q, Jacobsen, GE, Smith, AM, Tuniz, C. 1997. 14C AMS measurements of the bomb pulse in N- and S-Hemisphere tropical trees. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 123(1–4):447–50.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Naegler, T, Ciais, P, Rodgers, K, Levin, I. 2006. Excess radiocarbon constraints on air-sea gas exchange and the uptake of CO2 by the oceans. Geophysical Research Letters 33(11): L11802, doi:10.1029/2005GL025408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Noakes, JE, Kim, S, Stipp, JJ. 1965. Chemical and counting advances in liquid scintillation age dating. In: Chatters, RM, Olson, EA, editors. Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on 14C and Tritium Dating. Washington, DC: U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. p 6892.Google Scholar
Nydal, R, Lövseth, K. 1996. Carbon 14 measurement in atmospheric CO2 from Northern and Southern Hemisphere sites, 1962–1993, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. Oak Ridge: Oak Ridge National Laboratory.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pumijumnog, N, Park, W-K. 1999. Vessel chronologies from teak in northern Thailand and their climatic signal. IAWA Journal 20(3):285–94.Google Scholar
Randerson, JT, Enting, IG, Schuur, EAG, Caldeira, K, Fung, IY. 2002. Seasonal and latitudinal variability of troposphere Δ14CO2: post bomb contributions from fossil fuels, oceans, the stratosphere, and the terrestrial biosphere. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 16(4):1112, doi:10.1029/2002GB001876.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rozanski, K, Levin, I, Stock, J, Guevara Falcon, RE, Rubio, F. 1995. Atmospheric 14CO2 variations in the equatorial region. Radiocarbon 37(2):509–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sarma, VVSS, Kumar, MD, George, MD. 1998. The central and the eastern Arabian Sea as a perennial source of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Tellus B 50(2):179–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shah, SK, Bhattacharyya, A, Chaudhury, V. 2007. Reconstruction of June-September precipitation based on tree-ring data of teak (Tectona grandis L.) from Hoshangabad, Madhya Pradesh, India. Dendrochronologia 25(1):5764.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stuiver, M, Polach, HA. 1977. Discussion: reporting of 14C data. Radiocarbon 19(3):355–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sweeney, C, Gloor, E, Jacobson, AR, Key, RM, McKinley, G, Sarmiento, JL, Wanninkhof, R. 2007. Constraining global air-sea gas exchange for CO2 with recent bomb 14C measurements. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 21:GB2015, doi:10.1029/2006GB002784.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Takahashi, T. 1989. The carbon dioxide puzzle. Oceanus 32:22–9.Google Scholar
Tans, PP. 1978. Carbon 13 and carbon 14 in trees and the atmospheric CO2 increase [PhD dissertation]. University Groningen, the Netherlands.Google Scholar
Troup, RS. 1921. The Silviculture of Indian Trees. Volume 2. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 640 p.Google Scholar
Turnbull, JC, Miller, JB, Lehman, SJ, Tans, PP, Sparks, RJ, Southon, J. 2006. Comparison of 14CO2, CO, and SF6 as tracers for recently added fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere and implications for biological CO2 exchange. Geophysical Research Letters 33: L01817, doi:10.1029/2005GL024213.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access
5
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Atmospheric 14C Variability Recorded in Tree Rings from Peninsular India: Implications for Fossil Fuel CO2 Emission and Atmospheric Transport
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Atmospheric 14C Variability Recorded in Tree Rings from Peninsular India: Implications for Fossil Fuel CO2 Emission and Atmospheric Transport
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Atmospheric 14C Variability Recorded in Tree Rings from Peninsular India: Implications for Fossil Fuel CO2 Emission and Atmospheric Transport
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *