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Widespread Fossil CO2 in the Ansanto Valley (Italy): Dendrochronological, 14C, and 13C Analyses on Tree Rings

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 February 2016

Manuela Capano
Affiliation:
INNOVA – CIRCE (Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage), Caserta, Italy Department of Letters and Cultural Heritage, Second University of Naples, Santa Maria Capua Vetere, CE, Italy
Simona Altieri
Affiliation:
INNOVA – CIRCE (Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage), Caserta, Italy Department of Environmental, Biological and Pharmacological Sciences and Technologies, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy
Fabio Marzaioli
Affiliation:
INNOVA – CIRCE (Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage), Caserta, Italy Department of Mathematics and Physics, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy
Carmina Sirignano
Affiliation:
INNOVA – CIRCE (Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage), Caserta, Italy Department of Environmental, Biological and Pharmacological Sciences and Technologies, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy
Olivia Pignatelli
Affiliation:
Dendrodata s.a.s., Verona, Italy
Nicoletta Martinelli
Affiliation:
Dendrodata s.a.s., Verona, Italy
Isabella Passariello
Affiliation:
INNOVA – CIRCE (Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage), Caserta, Italy
Carlo Sabbarese
Affiliation:
INNOVA – CIRCE (Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage), Caserta, Italy Department of Mathematics and Physics, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy
Paola Ricci
Affiliation:
INNOVA – CIRCE (Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage), Caserta, Italy Department of Environmental, Biological and Pharmacological Sciences and Technologies, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy
Stefania Gigli
Affiliation:
Department of Letters and Cultural Heritage, Second University of Naples, Santa Maria Capua Vetere, CE, Italy
Filippo Terrasi
Affiliation:
INNOVA – CIRCE (Centre for Isotopic Research on Cultural and Environmental Heritage), Caserta, Italy Department of Mathematics and Physics, Second University of Naples, Caserta, Italy
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The Ansanto Valley (southern Italy) is characterized by vents and boiling mud lakes that emit typical volcanic exhalations (mostly fossil CO2). This fossil dilution spreads over the Ansanto Valley and its impact on local trees is investigated in this study. Six trees at increasing distance from the emitting sources and 2 aliquots of gas were sampled. Dendrochronological analysis was performed on tree cores in order to check the accuracy of the tree-ring sequences; the results indicate no anomalies in the curves of the analyzed trees. δ13C and radiocarbon (14C) analyses were performed on the α-cellulose extracted from some selected tree rings. The main aim of δ13C analysis was to gain information about the origin of CO2 arising from the source; the results support the hypothesis of a carbonatic origin, with respect to a volcanic origin. 14C analysis was performed to evaluate the influence and to quantify the percentage of fossil dilution characterizing the local atmosphere and affecting the trees at different distances from the source during the years. The results show the presence of a strong fossil dilution affecting the trees, increasing toward the sources (from ∼6% at 80 m distance to ∼30% at 20 m from the nearest vent) with quite stable values over the examined period.

Type
Radiocarbon Reservoir Effects
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona 

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