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Status report of the Trondheim Radiocarbon Laboratory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 October 2019

Martin Seiler
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
Pieter M Grootes
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
John Haarsaker
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
Sylvie Lélu
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
Izabela Rzadeczka-Juga
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
Sølvi Stene
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
Helene Svarva
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
Terje Thun
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
Einar Værnes
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
Marie-Josée Nadeau
Affiliation:
The National Laboratory for Age Determination, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU University Museum, Trondheim, Norway
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

The Trondheim radiocarbon (14C) laboratory has evolved from a traditional radiocarbon decay counting laboratory to an accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) facility primarily measuring 14C. This evolution required adjustments in sample preparation and data handling to match the capacity of the AMS system and reduction in sample sizes to about 1 mgC. We summarize here the steps involved in dating a sample at the National Laboratory for Age Determination in Trondheim, Norway. These include the structure of our sample database for information handling, sample cleaning procedures for different sample types, our reduction systems, both an automated EA-based system for regular use and a manual system for more challenging samples, and data evaluation. We will also briefly summarize the capabilities of our isotope-ratio mass spectrometer.

Type
Conference Paper
Copyright
© 2019 by the Arizona Board of Regents on behalf of the University of Arizona 

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Footnotes

Selected Papers from the 23rd International Radiocarbon Conference, Trondheim, Norway, 17–22 June, 2018

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