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Temperature and Salinity Effects on Alkenone Ratios Measured in Surface Sediments from the Indian Ocean

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Corinne Sonzogni
Affiliation:
CEREGE, CNRS-Université d’Aix-Marseille III, Europole de l’Arbois, BP80, 13545, Aix-en-Provence Cedex 4, France
Edouard Bard
Affiliation:
CEREGE, CNRS-Université d’Aix-Marseille III, Europole de l’Arbois, BP80, 13545, Aix-en-Provence Cedex 4, France
Frauke Rostek
Affiliation:
CEREGE, CNRS-Université d’Aix-Marseille III, Europole de l’Arbois, BP80, 13545, Aix-en-Provence Cedex 4, France
Denis Dollfus
Affiliation:
CEREGE, CNRS-Université d’Aix-Marseille III, Europole de l’Arbois, BP80, 13545, Aix-en-Provence Cedex 4, France
Antoni Rosell-Melé
Affiliation:
Organic Geochemistry Unit, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TS, UK
Geoffrey Eglinton
Affiliation:
Organic Geochemistry Unit, School of Chemistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1TS, UK

Abstract

We compare alkenone unsaturation ratios measured on recent sediments from the Indian Ocean (20°N–45°S) with modern sea oceanographic parameters. For each of the core sites we estimated average seasonal cycles of sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity, which we then weighted with the seasonal productivity cycle derived from chlorophyll satellite imagery. The unsaturation index (U 37 K′) ranges from 0.2 to 1 and correlates with water temperature but not with salinity. TheU 37 K′versus SST relationship for Indian Ocean sediments (U 37 K′= 0.033 SST + 0.05) is similar to what has been observed for core tops from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and the Black Sea. A global compilation for core tops givesU 37 K′= 0.031 T + 0.084 (R= 0.98), which is close to a previously reported calibration based on particulate organic matter from the water column. For temperatures between 24° and 29°C, however, the slope seems to decrease to about 0.02U 37 K′unit/°C. For Indian Ocean core tops, the ratios of total C37alkenones/total C38alkenones and the slope of theU 37 K′-SST relationship are similar to those previously observed for cultures ofEmiliania huxleyibut different from those previously published forGephyrocapsa oceanica.EitherE. huxleyiis a major producer of alkenones in the Indian Ocean or strains ofG. oceanicaliving in the northern Indian Ocean behave differently from the one cultured. In contrast with coccolithophorid assemblages, the ratios of C37alkenones to total C38alkenones lack clear geographic pattern in the Indian Ocean.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
University of Washington

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