Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-56f9d74cfd-rpbls Total loading time: 0.265 Render date: 2022-06-25T09:14:01.890Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true }

Plankton Ecology and the Paleoceanographic–Climatic Record

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Paul Loubere*
Affiliation:
Department of Geology, Northern Illinois University, Dekalb, Illinois 60115

Abstract

The paleoceanographic–climatic record represented by deep-sea microfossils reflects conditions for only certain times of the year. Also, the relative abundances of microfossil species in deep-sea sediments do not usually reflect only one paleoceanographic variable, such as temperature. Rather, species distributions represent the integration of many factors that control biological production in the oceans. This influences the information on past climates that can be extracted from fossil material. The seasonal limitation is due to the cyclic nature of biological production in the open ocean. Case studies of the sediment record in the Atlantic for two species of planktonic Foraminifera, left-coiling Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (Ehrenberg) and Globigerinoides ruber (d'Orbigny), illustrate seasonal bias in environmental data reported by the relative abundances of species in deep-sea sediments. In addition, the study of G. ruber illustrates the operation of two oceanographic parameters in controlling a species distribution. These examples demonstrate that the environmental signal in the sediments is the result of the interplay of the ecological tolerance of the plankton species with seasonally variable biological and physical properties of the upper ocean.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
University of Washington

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bandy, O. (1960). The geologic significance of coiling ratios in the Foraminifera Globigerina pachyderma (Ehrenberg). Journal of Paleontology 34, 671681.Google Scholar
Barry, R. (1975). Climate models in paleoclimatic reconstruction. Paleogeography, Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology 17, 123137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
, A. (1977). Recent planktonic Foraminifera. Oceanic Micropaleontology Ramsay, A. Vol. 1 Academic Press. New York 1100.Google Scholar
, A. Tolderlund, D. (1971). Distribution and ecology of living planktonic Foraminifera in surface waters of the Atlantic and Indian oceans. The Micropaleontology of Oceans Funnell, B. Riedel, W. Cambridge Univ. Press. London/New York 105149.Google Scholar
Berger, W. (1976). Biogenous deep sea sediments. Chemical Oceanography Riley, J. Chester, R. Vol. 5 Academic Press. London 265388.Google Scholar
Berger, W. Gardner, J. (1975). On the determination of Pleistocene temperatures from planktonic Foraminifera. Journal of Foraminiferal Research 5, 102113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chayes, F. (1971). Ratio Correlation. Univ. of Chicago Press. Chicago.Google Scholar
Chayes, F. (1975). Apriori and experimental approximation of simple ratio correlations. Concepts in Geostatistics McCammon, R. Springer-Verlag. New York 106137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
CLIMAP, Project Members, . 1976. The surface of the Ice Age Earth. Science 191, 11311137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corlett, J. (1953). Net phytoplankton at ocean weather stations ‘I’ and ‘J’. Journal for the Permanent International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 19 2 178190.Google Scholar
Ericson, D. (1959). Coiling direction of Globigerina pachyderma as a climatic index. Science 130, 219220.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gates, L. 1976a. Modelling the Ice Age climate. Science 191, 11381144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gates, L. 1976b. The numerical simulation of Ice Age climate with a global general circulation model. Journal of Atmospheric Science 33, 18441873.2.0.CO;2>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holmes, R. (1956). The annual cycle of phytoplankton in the Labrador Sea, 1950-51. Bulletin of the Bingham Oceanographic Collection 16, 373.Google Scholar
Imbrie, J. Kipp, N. (1971). A new micropaleontological method for quantitative paleoclimatology, application to a late Pleistocene Caribbean core. The Late Cenozoic Glacial Ages Turekian, K. Yale Univ. Press. New Haven, Conn 71181.Google Scholar
Kipp, N. (1976). New transfer function for estimating past surface conditions from sea-bed distribution of planktonic Foraminiferal assemblages in the North Atlantic. Geological Society of America Memoirs 145, 342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lynts, G. Judd, J. (1971). Late Pleistocene paleotemperatures at Tongue of the Ocean, Bahamas. Science 171, 11431144.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Manabe, S. Hahn, D. (1977). Simulation of the tropical climate of an Ice Age. Journal of Geophysical Research 82 27 38893911.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McConnaughey, B. (1978). Introduction to Marine Biology. Mosby. St. Louis.Google Scholar
McGill, D. (1966). Fertility of the oceans. The Encyclopedia of Oceanography Fairbridge, R. Van Nostrand Reinhold. New York 268272.Google Scholar
Neter, J. Wasserman, W. (1974). Applied Linear Statistical Models. Richard D. Irwin. Homewood, Ill.Google Scholar
Riley, G. (1942). The relationship of vertical turbulence and spring diatom flowerings. Journal of Marine Research 5 1 6787.Google Scholar
Riley, G. (1943). Physiological aspects of spring diatom flowerings. Bulletin of the Bingham Oceanographic Collection 8 4 153.Google Scholar
Sachs, H. Webb, T. Clark, D. (1977). Paleoecological transfer functions. Annual Reviews of Earth and Planetary Science 5, 159178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steeman-Nielson, E. (1958). Light and organic production in the sea. Reports of the Permanent International Council for the Exploration of the Sea 144, 141147.Google Scholar
Sverdrup, H. Johnson, M. Fleming, R. (1942). The Oceans. Prentice-Hall. New York.Google Scholar
Tolderlund, D. , A. (1971). Seasonal distribution of planktonic Foraminifera in the western North Atlantic. Micropaleontology 17 3 297329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
U.S. Naval Oceanographic Atlas of the North Atlantic, . 1967. Section 2: Physical Properties. U.S. Naval Oceanographic Office. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
Webb, T. Clark, D. (1977). Calibrating micropaleontological data in climatic terms: A critical review. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 288, 93118.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williams, J. (1978). A brief comparison of model simulations of glacial period maximum atmospheric circulation. Paleogeography, Paleoclimatology, Paleoecology 25, 191198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Plankton Ecology and the Paleoceanographic–Climatic Record
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Plankton Ecology and the Paleoceanographic–Climatic Record
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Plankton Ecology and the Paleoceanographic–Climatic Record
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *