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A loess–paleosol record of climate and glacial history over the past two glacial–interglacial cycles (~ 150 ka), southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Kenneth L. Pierce*
Affiliation:
US Geological Survey, 2327 University Way, Box 2, Bozeman, MT 59715, USA
Daniel R. Muhs
Affiliation:
US Geological Survey, MS 980, Box 25046 Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225, USA
Maynard A. Fosberg
Affiliation:
Soil and Land Resources Division, Box 442339, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844-2339, USA
Shannon A. Mahan
Affiliation:
US Geological Survey, MS 974, Box 25046 Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225, USA
Joseph G. Rosenbaum
Affiliation:
US Geological Survey, MS 980, Box 25046 Denver Federal Center, Denver, CO 80225, USA
Joseph M. Licciardi
Affiliation:
Department of Earth Sciences, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
Milan J. Pavich
Affiliation:
US Geological Survey, 955 National Center, Reston, VA 20192, USA
*
Corresponding author. Fax: + 1 406 994 6556. E-mail address:kpierce@usgs.gov (K.L. Pierce).

Abstract

Loess accumulated on a Bull Lake outwash terrace of Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6) age in southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming. The 9 m section displays eight intervals of loess deposition (Loess 1 to Loess 8, oldest), each followed by soil development. Our age-depth model is constrained by thermoluminescence, meteoric 10Be accumulation in soils, and cosmogenic 10Be surface exposure ages. We use particle size, geochemical, mineral-magnetic, and clay mineralogical data to interpret loess sources and pedogenesis. Deposition of MIS 6 loess was followed by a tripartite soil/thin loess complex (Soils 8, 7, and 6) apparently reflecting the large climatic oscillations of MIS 5. Soil 8 (MIS 5e) shows the strongest development. Loess 5 accumulated during a glacial interval (~ 76–69 ka; MIS 4) followed by soil development under conditions wetter and probably colder than present. Deposition of thick Loess 3 (~ 43–51 ka, MIS 3) was followed by soil development comparable with that observed in Soil 1. Loess 1 (MIS 2) accumulated during the Pinedale glaciation and was followed by development of Soil 1 under a semiarid climate. This record of alternating loess deposition and soil development is compatible with the history of Yellowstone vegetation and the glacial flour record from the Sierra Nevada.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
University of Washington

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A loess–paleosol record of climate and glacial history over the past two glacial–interglacial cycles (~ 150 ka), southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming
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A loess–paleosol record of climate and glacial history over the past two glacial–interglacial cycles (~ 150 ka), southern Jackson Hole, Wyoming
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