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Late Quaternary (≥MIS 3 to MIS 1) stratigraphic transitions in a highland Beringian landscape along the Kuskokwim River, Alaska

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 October 2019

Joshua D. Reuther
Affiliation:
University of Alaska Museum of the North, 1962 Yukon Drive, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, USA Department of Anthropology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 310 Eielson Building, PO Box 757720, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, USA
Jason Rogers
Affiliation:
National Park Service, 240 W. 5th Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska 99501, USA
Patrick Druckenmiller
Affiliation:
University of Alaska Museum of the North, 1962 Yukon Drive, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, USA Department of Geosciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 1930 Yukon Drive, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, USA
Thomas K. Bundtzen
Affiliation:
Pacific Rim Geological Consulting, PO Box 81906, Fairbanks, Alaska 99708, USA
Kristi Wallace
Affiliation:
United States Geological Survey, Alaska Volcano Observatory, 4120 University Drive, Anchorage, Alaska 99508, USA
Robert Bowman
Affiliation:
Northern Land Use Research Alaska, 725 Christensen Drive, Suite 4, Anchorage, Alaska 99501, USA
Kevin May
Affiliation:
University of Alaska Museum of the North, 1962 Yukon Drive, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775, USA
James Feathers
Affiliation:
University of Washington Luminescence Laboratory, Department of Anthropology, University of Washington, Denny Hall M32, Box 353100, Seattle, Washington 98195-3100, USA
Alexander Cherkinsky
Affiliation:
University of Georgia, Center for Applied Isotope Studies, 120 Riverbend Road, Athens, Georgia 30602, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Stratigraphic records extending to Marine Oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 (57,000–29,000 cal yr BP) or older in Beringia are extremely rare. Three stratigraphic sections in interior western Alaska show near continuous sedimentological and environmental progressions extending from at least MIS 3, if not older, through MIS 1 (14,000 cal yr BP–present). The Kolmakof, Sue Creek, and VABM (vertical angle bench mark) Kuskokwim sections along the central Kuskokwim River, once a highland landscape at the fringe of central and eastern Beringia, contain aeolian deposition and soil sequences dating beyond 50,000 14C yr BP. Thick peaty soil, shallow lacustrine, and tephra deposits represent the MIS 3 interstade (or older). Sand sheet and loess deposits, wedge cast development, and very thin soil development mark the later MIS 3 period and the transition into the MIS 2 stade (29,000–14,000 cal yr BP). Loess accumulation with thicker soil development occurred between ~16,000–13,500 cal yr BP at the MIS 2 and MIS 1 transition. After ~13,500 cal yr BP, loess accumulation waned and peat development increased throughout MIS 1. These stratigraphic sequences represent transitions between a warm and moist period during MIS 3, to a cooler and more arid period during MIS 2, then a return to warmer and moister climates in MIS 1.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © University of Washington. Published by Cambridge University Press, 2019 

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Late Quaternary (≥MIS 3 to MIS 1) stratigraphic transitions in a highland Beringian landscape along the Kuskokwim River, Alaska
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Late Quaternary (≥MIS 3 to MIS 1) stratigraphic transitions in a highland Beringian landscape along the Kuskokwim River, Alaska
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