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Electron spin resonance optical dating of marine, estuarine, and aeolian sediments in Florida, USA

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Kevin E. Burdette*
Affiliation:
School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1
William J. Rink
Affiliation:
School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada L8S 4K1
David J. Mallinson
Affiliation:
Department of Geological Sciences, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858, USA
Guy H. Means
Affiliation:
Florida Geological Survey, 903 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL 32304-7716, USA
Peter R. Parham
Affiliation:
Institute of Oceanography, University Malaysia Terengganu, Kuala Terengganu 21300, Malaysia
*
*Corresponding author. E-mail address: keb1003@gmail.com (K.E. Burdette).

Abstract

For the first time, electron spin resonance optical dating (ESROD) has been conducted on littorally transported and aeolian siliciclastic sediments in Florida. ESROD utilizes light-sensitive radiation-sensitive defects at silicon sites that have been replaced by aluminum and titanium atoms to give rise to a time-dependant signal. These defects saturate at higher levels of radiation dose, compared to optically stimulated luminescence, and therefore extend the optical dating range back into the millions of years. Our results show that the Trail Ridge Sequence is a multi-depositional unit that began deposition around 2.2 Ma and continued until 6 ka. The Osceola Cape, of the Effingham Sequence, was deposited around 1.5 Ma, and the Chatham Sequence was a multi-depositional terrace with at least three events preserved.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
University of Washington

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