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Direct terrestrial–marine correlation demonstrates surprisingly late onset of the last interglacial in central Europe

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Mark J. Sier
Affiliation:
Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9515, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands Paleomagnetic Laboratory ‘Fort Hoofddijk’, Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Budapestlaan 17, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands National Center for Human Evolution (CENIEH), Paseo Sierra de Atapuerca s/n, 09002 Burgos, Spain
Wil Roebroeks*
Affiliation:
Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9515, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands
Corrie C. Bakels
Affiliation:
Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9515, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands
Mark J. Dekkers
Affiliation:
Paleomagnetic Laboratory ‘Fort Hoofddijk’, Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, Budapestlaan 17, 3584 CD Utrecht, The Netherlands
Enrico Brühl
Affiliation:
Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologie, Richard-Wagner-Str. 9, 06114 Halle, Germany Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum, Forschungsbereich Altsteinzeit, Schloss Monrepos, 56567 Neuwied, Germany
Dimitri De Loecker
Affiliation:
Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9515, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands
Sabine Gaudzinski-Windheuser
Affiliation:
Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum, Forschungsbereich Altsteinzeit, Schloss Monrepos, 56567 Neuwied, Germany Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Institut für Vor- und Frühgeschichte, Schönborner Hof, Schillerstrasse 11, 55116 Mainz, Germany
Norbert Hesse
Affiliation:
Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologie, Richard-Wagner-Str. 9, 06114 Halle, Germany
Adam Jagich
Affiliation:
Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9515, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands
Lutz Kindler
Affiliation:
Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum, Forschungsbereich Altsteinzeit, Schloss Monrepos, 56567 Neuwied, Germany
Wim J. Kuijper
Affiliation:
Faculty of Archaeology, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9515, 2300 RA Leiden, The Netherlands
Thomas Laurat
Affiliation:
Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologie, Richard-Wagner-Str. 9, 06114 Halle, Germany Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum, Forschungsbereich Altsteinzeit, Schloss Monrepos, 56567 Neuwied, Germany
Herman J. Mücher
Affiliation:
Prinses Beatrixsingel 21, 6301 VK Valkenburg, The Netherlands
Kirsty E.H. Penkman
Affiliation:
“BioArCh” Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD, UK
Daniel Richter
Affiliation:
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Department of Human Evolution, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
Douwe J.J. van Hinsbergen
Affiliation:
Physics of Geological Processes, University of Oslo, Sem Sælands vei 24, 0391 Oslo, Norway
*
Corresponding author.

Abstract

An interdisciplinary study of a small sedimentary basin at Neumark Nord 2 (NN2), Germany, has yielded a high-resolution record of the palaeomagnetic Blake Event, which we are able to place at the early part of the last interglacial pollen sequence documented from the same section. We use this data to calculate the duration of this stratigraphically important event at 3400 ± 350 yr. More importantly, the Neumark Nord 2 data enables precise terrestrial–marine correlation for the Eemian stage in central Europe. This shows a remarkably large time lag of ca. 5000 yr between the MIS 5e ‘peak’ in the marine record and the start of the last interglacial in this region.

Type
Short Paper
Copyright
University of Washington

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Footnotes

1 Retired from the University of Amsterdam.

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