Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-lmg95 Total loading time: 0.208 Render date: 2021-10-19T13:15:06.018Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Dendroclimatic Reconstruction of April–May Temperature Fluctuations in the Western Himalaya of India Since A.D. 1698

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2017

Ram R. Yadav
Affiliation:
Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, 53 University Road, Lucknow, 226007, India
Won-Kyu Park
Affiliation:
School of Forest Resources, College of Agriculture, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, 361-763, Korea
Amalava Bhattacharyya
Affiliation:
Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, 53 University Road, Lucknow, 226007, India

Abstract

Ring-width chronologies of Himalayan cedar (Cedrus deodara (D. Don.) G. Don.), Himalayan pine (Pinus wallichiana A. B. Jackson), and Himalayan spruce (Picea smithiana (Wall.) Boiss.) from the western Himalayan region, India, have been used to reconstruct mean April–May temperature back to A. D. 1698. The reconstruction correlates significantly with the average April–May instrumental temperature record (r= +0.62, 1876–1988) and is characterized by annual to multiyear fluctuations. The most striking feature of the present reconstruction is the absence of any warming trend in the 20th century. Relationships between the mean April–May temperature for the western Himalayan region, Indian summer monsoon rainfall, and Southern Oscillation Index indicate that the tree-ring chronologies, as surrogate temperature records, will provide valuable data for climate change studies with regional and global perspectives.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
University of Washington

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bhattacharyya, A., Telewski, F. W. and LaMarche, V. C., (1988). Dendro-chronological reconnaissance of the conifers of north-west India. Tree-Ring Bulletin 48, 334343.Google Scholar
Bradley, R. S. and Jones, P. D., (1993). “Little Ice Age” summer temperature variations: Their nature and relevance to recent global warming trends. Holocene 3, 367376.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Briffa, K. R., Jones, P. D. and Schweingruber, F. H., (1988). Summer temperature patterns over Europe: A reconstruction from 1750 A.D. based on maximum latewood density indices of conifers. Quaternary Research 30, 3652.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cook, E. R., (1985). “A Time-Series Analysis Approach to Tree-Ring Standardization.” Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.Google Scholar
Cook, E. R., Briffa, K. R., Shiyatov, S. G. and Mazepa, V. S., (1989). Tree-ring standardization and growth-trend estimation. In “Methods of Dendrochronology” (E. R. Cook and L. A. Kairiukstis, Eds.), pp. 104123. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht.Google Scholar
Dey, B. and BhanuKumar, O. S. R. U., (1983). The Himalayan winter snow cover area and summer monsoon rainfall over India. Journal of Geophysical Research 88, 54715474.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fritts, F. H., (1976). “Tree Rings and Climate.” Academic Press, London.Google Scholar
Hughes, M. K., (1992). Dendroclimatic evidence from western Himalaya. In “Climate Since A.D. 1500” (R. S. Bradley and P. D. Jones, Eds.), pp. 415431. Routledge, London.Google Scholar
Hughes, M. K., (1994). Lessons from past global change. Journal of Korea Forestry Energy 14, 2334.Google Scholar
Hughes, M. K. and Davies, A. C., (1987). Dendrochronology in Kashmir using ring widths and densities in sub-alpine conifers. In “Methods of Dendrochronology: East/West Approaches” (L. Kairiukstis Z. Bednarz, and E. Feliksik, Eds.), pp. 163176. IIASA/Polish Academy of Sciences.Google Scholar
Hughes, M. K. and Diaz, H. F., (1994). Was there a “Medieval Warm Period,” and if so, where and when? Climatic Change 26, 109142.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Khandekar, M. L., (1991). Eurasian snow cover, Indian monsoon and El-Nino/Southern Oscillation-a synthesis. Atmosphere–Ocean 29, 636647.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Li, C. and Yanai, M., (1996). The onset and inter annual variability of the Asian summer monsoon in relation to land–sea thermal contrast. Journal of Climate 9, 358375.2.0.CO;2>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mann, M. E., Park, J. and Bradley, R. S., (1995). Global interdecadal and century-scale climate oscillations during the past five centuries. Nature 378, 266270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Overpeck, J., Anderson, D., Trumbore, S. and Prell, W., (1996). The southwest Indian monsoon over the last 18000 years. Climate Dynamics 12, 213225.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parthasarthy, B., Munot, A. A. and Kothawale, D. R., (1994). All-India monthly and seasonal rainfall series: 18711993. Theoretical and Applied Climatology 49, 217224.Google Scholar
Prell, W. L. and Kutzbach, J. F., (1992). Sensitivity of the Indian monsoon to forcing parameters and implications for its evolution. Nature 360, 647652.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vernekar, A. D., Zhou, J. and Shukla, J., (1995). The effect of Eurasian snow cover on the Indian monsoon. Journal of Climate 8, 248266.2.0.CO;2>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wright, P. B., (1989). Homogenized long-period southern oscillation indices. International Journal of Climatology 9, 3554.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Yadav, R. R. and Bhattacharyya, A., (1992). A 745-year chronology of Cedrus deodara from western Himalaya, India. Dendrochronologia 10, 5361.Google Scholar
42
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Dendroclimatic Reconstruction of April–May Temperature Fluctuations in the Western Himalaya of India Since A.D. 1698
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Dendroclimatic Reconstruction of April–May Temperature Fluctuations in the Western Himalaya of India Since A.D. 1698
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Dendroclimatic Reconstruction of April–May Temperature Fluctuations in the Western Himalaya of India Since A.D. 1698
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *