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Cardiovascular disease registers and recording of behavioural risk factors: why untapped opportunities continue

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2007

Roger A Harrison
Affiliation:
Directorate of Public Health, Bolton Primary Care TrustBolton, UK, andEvidence for Population Health UnitRoom 2.909 Stopford Building, University of ManchesterOxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PT, UK Email: roger.harrison-2@manchester.ac.uk
Georgios Lyratzopoulos
Affiliation:
Evidence for Population Health UnitUniversity of ManchesterManchester, UK
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Abstract

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Type
Commentary
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2005

References

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