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What shapes adolescents’ diet and physical activity habits in rural Konkan, India? Adolescents’ and caregivers’ perspectives

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  23 July 2020

Ulka Banavali
Affiliation:
Center for Adolescent Health and Nutrition, BKL Walawalkar Rural Medical College, Sawarde 415606, India
Suvarna Patil*
Affiliation:
Center for Adolescent Health and Nutrition, BKL Walawalkar Rural Medical College, Sawarde 415606, India
Rupali Chavan
Affiliation:
Center for Adolescent Health and Nutrition, BKL Walawalkar Rural Medical College, Sawarde 415606, India
Swati Sonawane
Affiliation:
Center for Adolescent Health and Nutrition, BKL Walawalkar Rural Medical College, Sawarde 415606, India
Charudatta Joglekar
Affiliation:
Center for Adolescent Health and Nutrition, BKL Walawalkar Rural Medical College, Sawarde 415606, India
Caroline Fall
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
Susie Weller
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
Sarah H Kehoe
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
Mary Barker
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
Polly Hardy-Johnson
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
*
*Corresponding author: Email dr.suvarnanpatil@gmail.com

Abstract

Objective:

To explore, adolescents’ and caregivers’ perspectives, about shaping of diet and physical activity habits in rural Konkan, India.

Design:

Five focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with adolescents and two with caregivers. Data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Setting:

FGD were conducted in secondary schools located in remote rural villages in the Ratnagiri district, Konkan region, Maharashtra, India.

Participants:

Forty-eight adolescents were recruited including twenty younger (10–12 years) and twenty-eight older (15–17 years) adolescents. Sixteen caregivers (all mothers) were also recruited.

Results:

Three themes emerged from discussion: (i) adolescents’ and caregivers’ perceptions of the barriers to healthy diet and physical activity, (ii) acceptance of the status quo and (iii) salience of social and economic transition. Adolescents’ basic dietary and physical activity needs were rarely met by the resources available and infrastructure of the villages. There were few opportunities for physical activity, other than performing household chores and walking long distances to school. Adolescents and their caregivers accepted these limitations and their inability to change them. Increased use of digital media and availability of junk foods marked the beginning of a social and economic transition.

Conclusion:

FGD with adolescents and their caregivers provided insights into factors influencing adolescent diet and physical activity in rural India. Scarcity of basic resources limited adolescent diet and opportunities for physical activity. To achieve current nutritional and physical activity recommendations for adolescents requires improved infrastructure in these settings, changes which may accompany the current Indian social and economic transition.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020

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Footnotes

The TALENT collaboration comprises: Laurence Adonis-Koffy, Yopougon University Hospital Faculty of Medical Sciences - UFHB de Cocody Abidjan Ivory Coast; Edna Bosire, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Harsha Chopra, Centre for the Study of Social Change, Mumbai, India; Meera Gandhi, Centre for the Study of Social Change, Mumbai, India; Abraham Haileamlak, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia; Ramatoulie Janha, MRC Keneba, MRC Unit The Gambia, MRC Keneba; Landing Jarjou, MRC Unit The Gambia; Julie Jesson, Inserm U1027, University of Toulouse, Paul Sabatier, France; Shama Joseph, Epidemiology Research Unit, CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India; Kejal Joshi Reddy, Unit, KEM Hospital, Pune, India; Elizabeth Kimani-Murage, African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC), Nairobi, Kenya; Egnon Kouakou, PAC-CI, Abidjan, Ivory Coast; GV Krishnaveni, Epidemiology Research Unit, CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India; Kalyanaraman Kumaran, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton and Head, UK and Epidemiology Research Unit, CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India; Valeriane Leroy, Inserm U1027, University of Toulouse, Paul Sabatier, France; Mubarek Abera Mengistie, Jimma University, Ethiopia; Sophie Moore, Kings College London, London, UK; Shane Norris, Developmental Pathways Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Sirazul Ameen Sahariah, Centre for the Study of Social Change, Mumbai, India; Kate Ward, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, UK; Stephanie Wrottesley, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Chittaranjan Yajnik, Diabetes Research Unit, KEM Hospital, Pune, India; Pallavi Yajnik, Diabetes Research Unit, KEM Hospital, Pune, India.

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