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Mexican households’ food shopping patterns in 2015: analysis following nonessential food and sugary beverage taxes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2020

Lilia S Pedraza
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
Barry M Popkin
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
Linda Adair
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
Whitney R Robinson
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
Lindsey Smith Taillie*
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
*
*Corresponding author: Email taillie@unc.edu

Abstract

Objective:

To examine patterns of taxed and untaxed food and beverage shopping across store types after Mexico’s sugary drink and non-essential food taxes, the nutritional quality of these patterns and the socio-economic characteristics associated with them.

Design:

We performed k-means cluster analyses using households’ percentage of food and beverage purchases from each store type (i.e. convenience stores, traditional shops (e.g. bodegas, tiendas, mom-and-pop shops), supermarkets, wholesalers and others). We calculated adjusted mean proportions of taxed and untaxed products (ml or g/capita per d) purchased in each pattern. We studied the associations between households’ SES and shopping patterns using multinomial logistic regressions. Within shopping patterns, we obtained mean volumes and proportions of taxed and untaxed food and beverage subgroups and calculated the proportion of products purchased at each store type.

Setting:

Mexico.

Participants:

Urban Mexican households (n 5493) from the Nielsen Mexico Consumer Panel Survey 2015.

Results:

We found four beverage shopping patterns and three food shopping patterns, driven by the store type where most purchases were made. For beverages, 48 % of households were clustered in the Traditional pattern and purchased the highest proportion of taxed beverages. Low-SES households had the highest probability of clustering in the Traditional beverage shopping pattern. For foods, 35 % of households were clustered into the Supermarket pattern. High-SES households had the highest probability of clustering in the Supermarket food shopping pattern.

Conclusions:

The combination of store types where Mexican households purchase packaged foods and beverages varies. However, households in all shopping patterns and SES purchase taxed beverages mainly at traditional stores. Store-level strategies should be developed to intervene on traditional stores to improve the healthfulness of purchases.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Authors 2020

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