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The idealisation of bottle feeding: content analysis of feeding bottles and teats packages in Uruguay

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 October 2020

Florencia Alcaire
Affiliation:
Instituto Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, ByPass de Rutas 8 y 101 s/n, 91000, Pando, Uruguay
Lucía Antúnez
Affiliation:
Instituto Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, ByPass de Rutas 8 y 101 s/n, 91000, Pando, Uruguay
Leticia Vidal
Affiliation:
Instituto Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, ByPass de Rutas 8 y 101 s/n, 91000, Pando, Uruguay
Carolina de León
Affiliation:
Núcleo Interdisciplinario ‘Alimentación y Bienestar’, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay
Alejandra Girona
Affiliation:
Departamento de Nutrición Básica, Escuela de Nutrición, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay
Raquel Rodríguez
Affiliation:
Departamento de Nutrición Básica, Escuela de Nutrición, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay
Ana Giménez
Affiliation:
Instituto Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, ByPass de Rutas 8 y 101 s/n, 91000, Pando, Uruguay
Isabel Bove
Affiliation:
UNICEF, Montevideo, Uruguay
Gastón Ares
Affiliation:
Instituto Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, ByPass de Rutas 8 y 101 s/n, 91000, Pando, Uruguay
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective:

The information displayed on the packages of feeding bottles and teats commercialised in Montevideo (Uruguay) was analysed using content analysis with the goal of identifying key marketing practices that may discourage breast-feeding.

Design:

The study was conducted as part of the periodic assessment performed by the Uruguayan government to monitor the marketing of breast milk substitutes. All the feeding bottles and teats sold in forty-four retail outlets selling breast milk substitutes were purchased. The information available on the packages was analysed using content analysis and descriptive statistics.

Setting:

Montevideo, Uruguay.

Results:

A total of 197 feeding bottles and 71 teats were found. The majority of the packages included information to enable caregivers to adequately use the products, including recommended age, instructions on how to use the products and instructions on the use of hygienic practices. However, the packages frequently included information that implied that bottle feeding was equivalent to breast-feeding, particularly from a physiological perspective, or that idealised product use. Idealisations included ability to reduce colic, improvements in the feeding experience and improvements in children’s health, well-being and development. Statements on the superiority of breast-feeding were infrequent.

Conclusions:

The results from the present work showed the high prevalence of marketing practices on the packages of feeding bottles and teats that may discourage breast-feeding. Stricter and more detailed regulations seem necessary to enable caregivers to make informed feeding decisions for infants.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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