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Contribution of food groups to energy, grams and nutrients-to-limit: the Latin American Study of Nutrition and Health/Estudio Latino Americano de Nutrición y Salud (ELANS)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 April 2021

Regina Mara Fisberg
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Ana Carolina Barco Leme
Affiliation:
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada Center for Excellence in Nutrition and Feeding Difficulties, PENSI Institute, Sabara’s Children Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil
Ágatha Previdelli
Affiliation:
School of Biological Science and Health, São Judas Tadeu University, São Paulo, Brazil
Aline Veroneze de Mello
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Angela Graciela Martinez
Affiliation:
School of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Valparaíso, Valparaíso, Chile
Cristiane Hermes Sales
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Georgina Gómez
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, University of Costa Rica, San José, Costa Rica
Irina Kovalskys
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Argentina, San José, Argentina
Marianella Herrera-Cuenca
Affiliation:
Center for Development Studies, Central University of Venezuela (CENDES-UCV)/Bengoa Foundation, San José, Venezuela
Lilia Yadira Cortés Sanabria
Affiliation:
Department of Nutrition and Biochemistry, Pontifical University of Javeriana, San José, Colombia
Martha Cecília Yépez García
Affiliation:
College of Health Science, University of San Francisco Quito, Quito, Ecuador
Rossina G. Torres
Affiliation:
Institute of Nutritional Investigation, La Molina, Peru
Attilio Rigotti
Affiliation:
Center of Molecular Nutrition and chronic diseases, Department of Nutrition, Diabetes, and Metabolism, School of Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, San José, Chile
Mauro Fisberg
Affiliation:
Center for Excellence in Nutrition and Feeding Difficulties, PENSI Institute, Sabara’s Children Hospital, São Paulo, Brazil
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Objective:

To quantify the energy, nutrients-to-limit and total gram amount consumed and identify their top food sources consumed by Latin Americans.

Design:

Data from the Latin American Study of Nutrition and Health (ELANS).

Setting:

ELANS is a cross-sectional study representative of eight Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela.

Participants:

Two 24-h dietary recalls on non-consecutive days were used to estimate usual dietary intake of 9218 participants with ages between 15–65 years. ‘What We Eat in America’ food classification system developed by United States Department of Agriculture was adapted and used to classify all food items consumed by the ELANS population. Food sources of energy, added sugars, SFA, Na and total gram amount consumed were identified and ranked based on percentage of contribution to intake of total amount.

Results:

Three-highest ranked food categories of total energy consumed were: rice (10·3%), yeast breads (6·9%), and turnovers and other grain-based items (6·8 %). Highest ranked food sources of total gram amount consumed were fruit drinks (9·6%), other 100% juice (9·3%) and rice (8·3%). Three highest ranked sources for added sugars were other 100% juice (24·1 %), fruit drinks (16·5%), and sugar and honey (12·4%). SFA ranked foods were turnovers and other grain-based (12·6 %), cheese (11·9%), and pizza (10·3%). Three top sources of Na were rice (13·9%), soups (9·1 %) and rice mixed dishes (7·3 %).

Conclusion:

Identification of top sources of energy and nutrients-to-limit among Latin Americans is critical for designing strategies to help them meet nutrient recommendations within energy needs.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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