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Associations between nutrient intakes and dietary patterns with different sarcopenia definitions in older Australian men: the concord health and ageing in men project

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 October 2020

Arpita Das*
Affiliation:
School of Life and Environmental Science Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, John Hopkins Drive, Sydney, Camperdown, NSW2006, Australia ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Robert G Cumming
Affiliation:
ANZAC Research Institute, University of Sydney and Concord Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Vasi Naganathan
Affiliation:
Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Fiona Blyth
Affiliation:
Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
David G Le Couteur
Affiliation:
ANZAC Research Institute, University of Sydney and Concord Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
David J Handelsman
Affiliation:
ANZAC Research Institute, University of Sydney and Concord Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Louise M Waite
Affiliation:
Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
Rosilene V Ribeiro
Affiliation:
School of Life and Environmental Science Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, John Hopkins Drive, Sydney, Camperdown, NSW2006, Australia
Stephen J Simpson
Affiliation:
School of Life and Environmental Science Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, John Hopkins Drive, Sydney, Camperdown, NSW2006, Australia
Vasant Hirani
Affiliation:
School of Life and Environmental Science Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, John Hopkins Drive, Sydney, Camperdown, NSW2006, Australia ANZAC Research Institute, University of Sydney and Concord Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
*Corresponding
*Corresponding author: Email Arpita.das@sydney.edu.au

Abstract

Objective:

To assess the associations between nutrient intake and dietary patterns with different sarcopenia definitions in older men.

Design:

Cross-sectional study.

Setting:

Sarcopenia was defined using the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH), the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP) and the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People 2 (EWGSOP2). Dietary adequacy of fourteen nutrients was assessed by comparing participants’ intakes with the Nutrient Reference Values (NRV). Attainment of NRV for nutrients was incorporated into a variable ‘poor’ (meeting ≤ 9) v. ‘good’ (meeting ≥ 10) using the cut-point method. Also, two different dietary patterns, monounsaturated:saturated fat and n-6:n-3 fatty acids ratio and individual nutrients were used as predictor variables.

Participants:

A total of 794 men aged ≥75 years participated in this study.

Results:

The prevalence of sarcopenia by the FNIH, EWGSOP and EWGSOP2 definitions was 12·9 %, 12·9 % and 19·6 %, respectively. With the adjustment, poor nutrient intake was significantly associated with FNIH-defined sarcopenia (OR: 2·07 (95 % CI 1·16, 3·67)), but not with EWGSOP and EWGSPOP2 definitions. The lowest and second-lowest quartiles of protein, Mg and Ca and the lowest quartiles of n-6 PUFA and n-3 PUFA intakes were significantly associated with FNIH-defined sarcopenia. Each unit decrease in n-6:n-3 ratio was significantly associated with a 9 % increased risk of FNIH-defined sarcopenia (OR: 1·09 (95 % CI 1·04, 1·16)).

Conclusions:

Inadequate intakes of nutrients are associated with FNIH-defined sarcopenia in older men, but not with the other two sarcopenia definitions. Further studies are required to understand these relationships.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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