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Anthropometric nutritional status, and social and dietary characteristics of African and Indian adolescents taking part in the TALENT (Transforming Adolescent Lives through Nutrition) qualitative study

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2020

Caroline HD Fall*
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
Mubarek Abera
Affiliation:
Faculty of Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Harsha Chopra
Affiliation:
Centre for the Study of Social Change, Mumbai, India
Polly Hardy-Johnson
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
Ramatoulie E Janha
Affiliation:
Medical Research Council (MRC) Unit The Gambia at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Banjul, The Gambia
Julie Jesson
Affiliation:
Inserm U1027, Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse 3, Toulouse, France
Charudutta Joglekar
Affiliation:
Regional Center for Adolescent Health and Nutrition, BKL Walawalkar Rural Medical College, Chiplun, India
Shama Joseph
Affiliation:
Epidemiology Research Unit, CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India
Sarah H Kehoe
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
Gudani Mukoma
Affiliation:
SAMRC/Wits Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Kejal Joshi-Reddy
Affiliation:
Diabetes Unit, King Edward Memorial Hospital and Research Centre, Pune, India
Kalyanaraman Kumaran
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK Epidemiology Research Unit, CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India
Mary E Barker
Affiliation:
MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK
*Corresponding
*Corresponding author: Email chdf@mrc.soton.ac.uk

Abstract

Objective:

To describe the anthropometry, socioeconomic circumstances, diet and screen time usage of adolescents in India and Africa as context to a qualitative study of barriers to healthy eating and activity.

Design:

Cross-sectional survey, including measured height and weight and derived rates of stunting, low BMI, overweight and obesity. Parental schooling and employment status, household assets and amenities, and adolescents’ dietary diversity, intake of snack foods, mobile/smartphone ownership and TV/computer time were obtained via a questionnaire.

Setting:

Four settings each in Africa (rural villages, West Kiang, The Gambia; low-income urban communities, Abidjan, Cote D’Ivoire; low/middle-class urban communities, Jimma, Ethiopia; low-income township, Johannesburg, South Africa) and India (rural villages, Dervan; semi-rural villages, Pune; city slums, Mumbai; low-middle/middle-class urban communities, Mysore).

Participants:

Convenience samples (n 41–112 per site) of boys and girls, half aged 10–12 years and another half aged 15–17 years, were recruited for a qualitative study.

Results:

Both undernutrition (stunting and/or low BMI) and overweight/obesity were present in all settings. Rural settings had the most undernutrition, least overweight/obesity and greatest diet diversity. Urban Johannesburg (27 %) and Abidjan (16 %), and semi-rural Pune (16 %) had the most overweight/obesity. In all settings, adolescents reported low intakes of micronutrient-rich fruits and vegetables, and substantial intakes of salted snacks, cakes/biscuits, sweets and fizzy drinks. Smartphone ownership ranged from 5 % (West Kiang) to 69 % (Johannesburg), higher among older adolescents.

Conclusions:

The ‘double burden of malnutrition’ is present in all TALENT settings. Greater urban transition is associated with less undernutrition, more overweight/obesity, less diet diversity and higher intakes of unhealthy/snack foods.

Type
Research paper
Copyright
© The Author(s), 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of The Nutrition Society

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Footnotes

The TALENT collaboration comprises: Laurence Adonis-Koffy, Yopougon University Hospital Faculty of Medical Sciences, UFHB de Cocody, Abidjan, Ivory Coast; Ulka Banavali, Regional Center for Adolescent Health and Nutrition, BKL Walawalkar Rural Medical College, Chiplun, India; Edna Bosire, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Meera Gandhi, Centre for the Study of Social Change, Mumbai, India; Abraham Haileamlak, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia; Landing Jarjou, MRC Unit The Gambia; Elizabeth Kimani-Murage, African Population and Health Research Center, Nairobi, Kenya; Egnon Kouakou, PAC-CI, Abidjan, Ivory Coast; G.V. Krishnaveni, Epidemiology Research Unit, CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital, Mysore, India; Valeriane Leroy, Inserm U1027, University of Toulouse, Paul Sabatier, France; Sophie Moore, Kings College London, London, UK; Shane Norris, Developmental Pathways Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Suvarna Patil, Regional Center for Adolescent Health and Nutrition, BKL Walawalkar Rural Medical College, Chiplun, India; Sirazul Ameen Sahariah, Centre for the Study of Social Change, Mumbai, India; Kate Ward, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, UK; Susie Weller, MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, UK; Stephanie Wrottesley, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Chittaranjan Yajnik, Diabetes Research Unit, KEM Hospital, Pune, India; Pallavi Yajnik, Diabetes Research Unit, KEM Hospital, Pune, India.

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Anthropometric nutritional status, and social and dietary characteristics of African and Indian adolescents taking part in the TALENT (Transforming Adolescent Lives through Nutrition) qualitative study
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