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Living well with dementia: a systematic review and correlational meta-analysis of factors associated with quality of life, well-being and life satisfaction in people with dementia – CORRIGENDUM

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2020

Anthony Martyr
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK PenCLAHRC, Institute of Health Research, University of Exeter Medical School, EX1 2LU, UK
Sharon M. Nelis
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK PenCLAHRC, Institute of Health Research, University of Exeter Medical School, EX1 2LU, UK
Catherine Quinn
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK PenCLAHRC, Institute of Health Research, University of Exeter Medical School, EX1 2LU, UK
Yu-Tzu Wu
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK PenCLAHRC, Institute of Health Research, University of Exeter Medical School, EX1 2LU, UK
Ruth A. Lamont
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK PenCLAHRC, Institute of Health Research, University of Exeter Medical School, EX1 2LU, UK
Catherine Henderson
Affiliation:
Personal Social Services Research Unit, London School of Economics and Political Science, WC2A 2AE, UK
Rachel Clarke
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Sussex, BN1 9RH, UK School of Education and Social Work, University of Sussex, BN1 9RH, UK
John V. Hindle
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, Bangor University, LL57 2AS, UK Department of Care for the Elderly, Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, Llandudno, LL30 1LB, UK
Jeanette M. Thom
Affiliation:
School of Medical Sciences, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052, Australia
Ian Rees Jones
Affiliation:
Wales Institute of Social and Economic Research, Data and Methods, Cardiff University, CF10 3BB, UK
Robin G. Morris
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, King's College London Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, London, SE5 8AF, UK
Jennifer M. Rusted
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Sussex, BN1 9RH, UK
Christina R. Victor
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Sciences, Brunel University, UB8 3PH, UK
Linda Clare
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, EX4 4QG, UK PenCLAHRC, Institute of Health Research, University of Exeter Medical School, EX1 2LU, UK Wellcome Centre for Cultures and Environments of Health, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK
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Abstract

Type
Corrigendum
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2020

Two errors have been identified in the analysis reported in the above article.

Figure 1: The number of studies included in quantitative synthesis (meta-analysis) was 198 rather than 199.

Figure 2: The authors reanalysed data for “Presence of religious beliefs/spirituality” as it was noticed that three data points were entered into the meta-analysis software with incorrect direction. The meta-analysis effect size originally reported was r = 0.35 (95% CI 0.12, 0.55), p = .0035, I 2 = 88.453, (I 2 was included in Supplementary Table 13a only). Reanalysis indicated a correct effect size of: r = 0.15 (−0.12, 0.15), p = .8280, I 2 = 62.101. Therefore, presence of religious beliefs/spirituality had a negligible association with better quality of life, rather than a moderate association as originally stated (p.2134).

The authors apologise for these errors.

References

Martyr, A., Nelis, S. M., Quinn, C., Wu, Y-T., Lamont, R. A., Henderson, C., Clarke, R., Hindle, J. V., Thom, J. M., Jones, I. R., Morris, R. G., Rusted, J. M., Victor, C. R., and Clare, L. (2018). Living well with dementia: a systematic review and correlational meta-analysis of factors associated with quality of life, well-being and life satisfaction in people with dementia. Psychological Medicine, 48 (13), 2130-2139. doi: 10.1017/S0033291718000405CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
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