Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-r9vz2 Total loading time: 0.206 Render date: 2021-07-28T08:50:11.943Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Priming and cued recall in elderly, alcohol intoxicated and sleep deprived subjects: a case of functionally similar memory deficits

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

Lars-Göran Nilsson
Affiliation:
University of Umeå, Sweden
Lars Bäckman
Affiliation:
University of Umeå, Sweden
Thomas Karlsson
Affiliation:
University of Umeå, Sweden

Synopsis

Young, old, alcohol intoxicated, and sleep deprived subjects studied weakly and strongly related word pairs, and were tested in lexical decision priming and cued recall. Results showed memory deficits for old, alcohol intoxicated, and sleep deprived subjects in cued recall of weakly related pairs. In contrast, there were no differences between these three groups and a control group of young subjects in cued recall of strongly related pairs, and there were no differences between groups in priming. This pattern of results is interpreted to support (a) a hypothesis of functional similarities between the memory deficits associated with adult ageing, alcohol intoxication, and sleep deprivation; (b) the notion that memory deficits in these subjects are more likely to occur in tasks which require effortful rather than automatic processes; and (c) the view that the memory deficits observed are due to inefficiencies at both encoding and retrieval.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1989

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Anderson, J. R. (1983). A spreading activation theory of memory. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior 11, 261295.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bäckman, L. (1985). Compensation and recoding: a framework for aging and memory research. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology 26, 193207.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bäckman, L. (1989) Varieties of memory compensation of older adults in episodic remembering. In Everyday Cognition in Adulthood and Old Age (ed. Poon, L. W., Rubin, D. C. and Wilson, B. S.), Cambridge University Press: New York.Google Scholar
Bäckman, L. & Nilsson, L.-G. (1985). Prerequisites for lack of age differences in memory performance. Experimental Aging Research 11, 6773.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bowles, N. L & Poon, L. W. (1981). The effect of age on speed of lexical access. Experimental Aging Research 7, 417425.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burke, D. M. & Light, L. L. (1981). Memory and aging: the role of retrieval processes. Psychological Bulletin 90, 513546.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cohen, J. (1977). Statistical Power Analysis for the Behavioral Sciences. Academic Press: New York.Google Scholar
Craik, F I. M. (1977). Similarities between the effects of aging and alcoholic intoxication on memory performance, construed within a ‘ Levels of Processing’ framework In Alcohol and Memory (ed Birnbaum, I M. and Parker, E. S.), pp. 922. Erlbaum. Hilsdale NJ.Google Scholar
Craik, F. I. M. (1983). On the transfer of information from temporary to permanent memory. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B303, 341359.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Craik, F. I. M. & Rabinowitz, J. C. (1984). Age differences in the acquisition and use of verbal information: A tutorial review. In Attention and Performance X (ed. Bouma, H. and Bouwhuis, D. G.), pp. 471500. Erlbaum: Exeter.Google Scholar
Elkin, A. J. & Murray, D J. (1974). The effects of sleep loss on short-term recognition memory. Canadian Journal of Psychology 28, 192198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hasher, L. & Zacks, R. T. (1979). Automatic and effortful processing in memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology. General 108, 356388.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hashtroudi, S., Parker, E. S., DeLisi, L. E. & Wyatt, R. J. (1983). On elaboration and alcohol. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior 22, 164173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hashtroudi, S., Parker, E. S., DeLisi, L. E., Wyatt, R. & Mutter, S. A. (1984). Intact retention in acute alcohol amnesia. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning. Memory, and Cognition 10, 156163.Google ScholarPubMed
Howard, D. V., McAndrews, M. P. & Lasaga, M. I. (1981) Semantic priming of lexical decisions in young and old adults. Journal of Gerontology 36, 707714.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kausler, D. H. (1982). Experimental Psychology and Human Aging Wiley: New York.Google Scholar
Kausler, D. H. & Lair, C. V. (1966). Associate strength and paired-associate learning in elderly subjects. Journal of Gerontology 21, 278280.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kirk, R. E. (1968). Experimental Design: Procedures for the Behavioral Sciences. Brooks/Cole: Belmont California.Google Scholar
McKoon, G., Ratcliff, R. (1979). Priming in episodic and semantic memory. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior 18, 463480.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moscovitch, M. (1982). A neuropsychological approach to perception and memory in normal and pathological aging. In Aging and Cognitive Processes (ed. Craik, F. I. M. and Trehub, S. E.), pp. 5578. Plenum Press: New YorkCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moskowitz, H. & Murray, J. T. (1976). Alcohol and backward masking of visual information. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 37, 4045.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nelson, T. O, McSpadden, M., Fromme, K. & Marlatt, G. A. (1986). Effects of alcohol intoxication on metamemory and on retrieval from long-term memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 10, 247254.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nilsson, L.-G. (1979). Functions of memory. In Perspectives on Memory Research (ed. Nilsson, L.-G), pp. 315. Erlbaum: Hillsdale NJ.Google Scholar
Nilsson, L.-G. (1984). New functionalism in memory research. In Psychology in the 1990s (ed. Lagerspetz, K. M. J. and Niemi, P.), pp. 185224. North-Holland: Amsterdam.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Polzella, D. J. (1975). Effects of sleep deprivation on short-term recognition memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Learning and Memory 104. 194200.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Poon, L. W. & Fozard, J. L. (1978). Speed of retrieval from long-term memory in relation to age, familiarity, and datedness of information. Journal of Gerontology 33, 711717.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rabinowitz, J. C. (1986). Priming in episodic memory. Journal of Gerontology 41, 204213.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rabinowitz, J. C. & Ackerman, B. P. (1982). General encoding of episodic events by elderly adults. In Aging and Cognitive Processes (ed. Craik, F. I. M. and Trehub, S. E.), pp. 145154. Plenum Press: New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Salthouse, T. A. (1980). Age and memory: Strategies for localizing the loss. In New Directions in Memory and Aging (ed. Poon, L. W., Fozard, J. L., Cermak, L. S., Arenberg, D. and Thompson, L. W.), pp. 4765. Erlbaum: Hillsdale NJ.Google Scholar
Salthouse, T. A. (1982). Adult Cognition. Springer-Verlag: New York.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaps, L. P. & Nilsson, L.-G. (1980). Encoding and retrieval operations in relation to age. Developmental Psychology 16, 636643.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaps, L. P., Johansson, B. S. & Nilsson, L.-G. (1976) Swedish Association Norms, (report No. 196, Uppsala Psychological Reports). Uppsala, Sweden: Department of Psychology, University of Uppsala.Google Scholar
Simon, E. (1979). Depth and elaboration of processing in relation to age Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory. 5, 115124.Google Scholar
Zaretsky, H. & Halberstam, J. (1968). Age differences in paired-associate learning. Journal of Gerontology 23, 165168.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
29
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Priming and cued recall in elderly, alcohol intoxicated and sleep deprived subjects: a case of functionally similar memory deficits
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Priming and cued recall in elderly, alcohol intoxicated and sleep deprived subjects: a case of functionally similar memory deficits
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Priming and cued recall in elderly, alcohol intoxicated and sleep deprived subjects: a case of functionally similar memory deficits
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *