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Prevalence, impact and cultural context of psychotic experiences among ethnic minority youth

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 August 2014

M. Adriaanse
Affiliation:
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, VU Medical Centre, The Netherlands Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, The Netherlands
L. van Domburgh
Affiliation:
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, VU Medical Centre, The Netherlands Research and Development, Intermetzo Youth Care, Zutphen, The Netherlands
H. W. Hoek
Affiliation:
Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands
E. Susser
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, NY, USA
T. A. H. Doreleijers
Affiliation:
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, VU Medical Centre, The Netherlands
W. Veling
Affiliation:
Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, The Hague, The Netherlands Department of Psychiatry, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, University Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands
Corresponding

Abstract

Background

The risk for psychotic disorders is increased for many ethnic minority groups and may develop in early childhood. This study investigated whether the prevalence of psychotic experiences (PE) with high impact is higher among ethnic minority youth compared to majority youth and examined the significance of these PE.

Method

A school-based study assessed a large community sample of 1545 ethnic minority and majority children in The Netherlands (mean age 12.98 ± 1.81 years). The Dutch (n = 702, 45.4%), Moroccan-Dutch (n = 400, 25.9%) and Turkish-Dutch (n = 170, 11.0%) ethnic groups could be studied separately. Self-report questionnaires on PE, impact and cultural context were administered.

Results

Prevalence of PE with high impact was 3.1% in Dutch, 9.5% in Moroccan-Dutch and 7.1% in Turkish-Dutch youth. Compared to Dutch youth, odds ratios were 3.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7–5.1] for Moroccan-Dutch youth and 2.2 (95% CI 1.1–4.6) for Turkish-Dutch youth. Differences were not explained by cultural or religious differences.

Conclusions

The increased risk for psychotic disorders in ethnic minorities may already be detectable in childhood, since PE with high impact were more common among ethnic minority youth compared to majority youth. The additional measurement of impact of PE appears to be a valid approach to identify those children at risk to develop psychotic or other more common psychiatric disorders.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2014 

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