Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-79b67bcb76-c2bf7 Total loading time: 0.232 Render date: 2021-05-15T18:52:50.842Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Article contents

Prenatal life and post-natal psychopathology: evidence for negative gene–birth weight interaction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 October 2002

M. C. WICHERS
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre and Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London; and Department of Child Psychiatry, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, and Centre for Human Genetics, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
S. PURCELL
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre and Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London; and Department of Child Psychiatry, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, and Centre for Human Genetics, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
M. DANCKAERTS
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre and Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London; and Department of Child Psychiatry, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, and Centre for Human Genetics, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
C. DEROM
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre and Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London; and Department of Child Psychiatry, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, and Centre for Human Genetics, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
R. DEROM
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre and Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London; and Department of Child Psychiatry, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, and Centre for Human Genetics, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
R. VLIETINCK
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre and Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London; and Department of Child Psychiatry, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, and Centre for Human Genetics, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
J. VAN OS
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry and Neuropsychology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Research Centre and Division of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, London; and Department of Child Psychiatry, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, and Centre for Human Genetics, Catholic University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Abstract

Background. Many studies suggest that pregnancy and birth complications (PBCs) are environmental risk factors for child psychopathology. However, it is not known whether the effects of PBCs occur independently of genetic predisposition. The current study examined the possibility of gene–environment interaction in a twin design.

Method. The East Flanders Prospective Twin Survey prospectively records the births of all twin pairs born in East Flanders, Belgium. The current study included 760 twin pairs aged 6–17 years. Multilevel regression analysis was used to assess the effects of several PBCs collected around the time of birth. Using structural equation modelling, ACE models assuming additive genetic (A), shared environmental (C) and unique environmental (E) influences, were compared in order to examine whether the contribution of genetic factors to parent-rated child problem behaviour varied as a function of exposure to dichotomously and continuously defined PBCs.

Results. A main independent effect of lower birth weight, corrected for gestational age (small for gestational age – SGA), on child problem behaviour was found. In addition, there was an interaction between genetic influence and SGA, in that being smaller for gestational age resulted in less influence of additive genetic factors on individual differences in problem behaviour.

Conclusions. Results are suggestive of negative gene–birth weight interaction. Children who are SGA are less sensitive to the genetic effects, and those with high genetic vulnerability are less sensitive to the effects of being SGA in bringing about post-natal mental health effects.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2002 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Prenatal life and post-natal psychopathology: evidence for negative gene–birth weight interaction
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Prenatal life and post-natal psychopathology: evidence for negative gene–birth weight interaction
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Prenatal life and post-natal psychopathology: evidence for negative gene–birth weight interaction
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *