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Polygenic prediction of the phenome, across ancestry, in emerging adulthood

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 November 2017

Anna R. Docherty
Affiliation:
Departments of Psychiatry & Human Genetics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Consortium for Families and Health Research, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Arden Moscati
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA Charles Bronfman Institute for Personalized Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York, USA
Danielle Dick
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Department of Human & Molecular Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA College Behavioral and Emotional Health Institute, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
Jeanne E. Savage
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA Department of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Jessica E. Salvatore
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA
Megan Cooke
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA
Fazil Aliev
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Department of Business, Karabuk University, Turkey
Ashlee A. Moore
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA
Alexis C. Edwards
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA
Brien P. Riley
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA
Daniel E. Adkins
Affiliation:
Departments of Psychiatry & Human Genetics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Consortium for Families and Health Research, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Roseann Peterson
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA
Bradley T. Webb
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA
Silviu A. Bacanu
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA
Kenneth S. Kendler
Affiliation:
Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, VA, USA
Corresponding
E-mail address:

Abstract

Background

Identifying genetic relationships between complex traits in emerging adulthood can provide useful etiological insights into risk for psychopathology. College-age individuals are under-represented in genomic analyses thus far, and the majority of work has focused on the clinical disorder or cognitive abilities rather than normal-range behavioral outcomes.

Methods

This study examined a sample of emerging adults 18–22 years of age (N = 5947) to construct an atlas of polygenic risk for 33 traits predicting relevant phenotypic outcomes. Twenty-eight hypotheses were tested based on the previous literature on samples of European ancestry, and the availability of rich assessment data allowed for polygenic predictions across 55 psychological and medical phenotypes.

Results

Polygenic risk for schizophrenia (SZ) in emerging adults predicted anxiety, depression, nicotine use, trauma, and family history of psychological disorders. Polygenic risk for neuroticism predicted anxiety, depression, phobia, panic, neuroticism, and was correlated with polygenic risk for cardiovascular disease.

Conclusions

These results demonstrate the extensive impact of genetic risk for SZ, neuroticism, and major depression on a range of health outcomes in early adulthood. Minimal cross-ancestry replication of these phenomic patterns of polygenic influence underscores the need for more genome-wide association studies of non-European populations.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2017 

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Footnotes

*

Both authors contributed equally to the manuscript

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