Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55b6f6c457-rq6d8 Total loading time: 0.202 Render date: 2021-09-24T13:36:44.189Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Personality traits among currently eating disordered, recovered and never ill first-degree female relatives of bulimic and control women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 November 2000

L. R. R. LILENFELD
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
D. STEIN
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
C. M. BULIK
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
M. STROBER
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
K. PLOTNICOV
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
C. POLLICE
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
R. RAO
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
K. R. MERIKANGAS
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
L. NAGY
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
W. H. KAYE
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA, Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, West Haven, CT, USA; and Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Abstract

Background. A combined family study and recovered study design was utilized to examine several hypothesized relationships between personality and bulimia nervosa (BN).

Methods. We studied 47 women with a lifetime history of DSM-III-R BN (31 currently ill and 16 recovered), 44 matched control women (CW) with no history of an eating disorder (ED), and their first-degree female relatives (N = 89 and N = 100, respectively), some of whom had current or previous EDs.

Results. BN probands' relatives with no ED history had significantly elevated levels of perfectionism, ineffectiveness, and interpersonal distrust compared to CW probands' relatives with no ED history. In contrast, diminished interoceptive awareness, heightened stress reactivity and perfectionistic doubting of actions were found among the previously eating disordered relatives of bulimic probands compared to their never ill relatives. Finally, a sense of alienation and emotional responsivity to the environment were elevated among currently ill compared to recovered bulimic probands.

Conclusions. The fact that perfectionism, ineffectiveness and interpersonal distrust are transmitted independently of an ED in relatives suggests that they may be of potential aetiological relevance for BN. In contrast, diminished interoceptive awareness, heightened stress reactivity and perfectionistic doubting of actions are more likely consequent to, or exacerbated by, previously having experienced the illness. Finally, a sense of alienation and emotional responsivity to the environment are more likely to be associated with currently having BN.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2000 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
134
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Personality traits among currently eating disordered, recovered and never ill first-degree female relatives of bulimic and control women
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Personality traits among currently eating disordered, recovered and never ill first-degree female relatives of bulimic and control women
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Personality traits among currently eating disordered, recovered and never ill first-degree female relatives of bulimic and control women
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *