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Increase of serum creatine phosphokinase in catatonia: an investigation in 32 acute catatonic patients

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

G. Northoff*
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Frankfurt, Germany
J. Wenke
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Frankfurt, Germany
B. Pflug
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Frankfurt, Germany
*
1Address for correspondence: Dr Georg Northoff, University of Frankfurt, Department of Psychiatry II, Heinrich-Hoffmann Strasse 10, 60528 Frankfurt/M, Germany.

Synopsis

We investigated serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK) and associated parkinsonic (SEPS) and dyskinetic (AIMS) movements in 32 hospital admitted acute catatonic patients. Thirty-two (N = 24 without neuroleptics on admission) catatonic patients were compared with 32 non-catatonic dyskinetic psychiatric patients, 32 non-catatonic non-dyskinetic psychiatric patients and 32 healthy controls. CPK was significantly higher (p = 0·015) in catatonics (mean 255·75, s.d. ± 226·54) than in healthy controls (38·6, ± 27·4) and non-catatonic non-dyskinetic psychiatric patients (57·1, ± 120·8) whereas there was no significant difference between catatonics and non-catatonic dyskinetic psychiatric patients (453·4, ± 128·5). There were significantly positive correlations between CPK and AIMS, as well as significantly negative correlations between CPK and SEPS, in all three groups. Our results suggest that increased serum CPK in catatonia may be related to occurrence of dyskinetic movements. Furthermore, we were able to distinguish a parkinsonic (low CPK, low AIMS, high SEPS) and a dyskinetic (high CPK, high AIMS, low SEPS) subtype in catatonia.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1996

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