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Impairment in the goal-directed corticostriatal learning system as a biomarker for obsessive–compulsive disorder

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2019

Chenjie Dong
Affiliation:
Center for the Study of Applied Psychology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science and School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China
Qiong Yang
Affiliation:
Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou, China
Jingjing Liang
Affiliation:
Center for the Study of Applied Psychology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science and School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China
Carol A. Seger
Affiliation:
Center for the Study of Applied Psychology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science and School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China Department of Psychology, Colorado State University, CO, USA
Hongying Han
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China
Yuping Ning
Affiliation:
Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China Affiliated Brain Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (Guangzhou Huiai Hospital), Guangzhou, China
Qi Chen*
Affiliation:
Center for the Study of Applied Psychology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science and School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China
ZiWen Peng*
Affiliation:
Center for the Study of Applied Psychology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science and School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China Department of Child Psychiatry, Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen University School of Medicine, Shenzhen, China
*
Author for correspondence: Ziwen Peng, E-mail: pengzw@email.szu.edu.cn and Qi Chen, E-mail: chen.qi@m.scnu.edu.cn
Author for correspondence: Ziwen Peng, E-mail: pengzw@email.szu.edu.cn and Qi Chen, E-mail: chen.qi@m.scnu.edu.cn

Abstract

Background

Compulsive behaviors in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have been related to impairment within the associative cortical-striatal system connecting the caudate and prefrontal cortex that underlies consciously-controlled goal-directed learning and behavior. However, little is known whether this impairment may serve as a biomarker for vulnerability to OCD.

Methods

Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we employed Granger causality analysis (GCA) to measure effective connectivity (EC) in previously validated striatal sub-regions, including the caudate, putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, in 35 OCD patients, 35 unaffected first-degree relatives and 35 matched healthy controls.

Results

Both OCD patients and their first-degree relatives showed greater EC than controls between the left caudate and the orbital frontal cortex (OFC). Both OCD patients and their first-degree relatives showed lower EC than controls between the left caudate and lateral prefrontal cortex. These results are consistent with findings from task-related fMRI studies which found impairment in the goal-directed system in OCD patients.

Conclusions

The same changes in EC were present in both OCD patients and their unaffected first-degree relatives suggest that impairment in the goal-directed learning system may be a biomarker for OCD.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019

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Footnotes

*

These authors contributed equally to this project.

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