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Differential effects on white-matter systems in high-functioning autism and Asperger's syndrome

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 April 2009

G. M. McAlonan*
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR China Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR China
C. Cheung
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR China
V. Cheung
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR China
N. Wong
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR China
J. Suckling
Affiliation:
Cambridge Brain Mapping Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
S. E. Chua
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR China Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR China
*
*Address for correspondence: G. M. McAlonan, Ph.D., M.B., B.S., Department of Psychiatry, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR China. (Email: mcalonan@hkucc.hku.hk)

Abstract

Background

Whether autism spectrum maps onto a spectrum of brain abnormalities and whether Asperger's syndrome (ASP) is distinct from high-functioning autism (HFA) are debated. White-matter maldevelopment is associated with autism and disconnectivity theories of autism are compelling. However, it is unknown whether children with ASP and HFA have distinct white-matter abnormalities.

Method

Voxel-based morphometry mapped white-matter volumes across the whole brain in 91 children. Thirty-six had autism spectrum disorder. A history of delay in phrase speech defined half with HFA; those without delay formed the ASP group. The rest were typically developing children, balanced for age, IQ, gender, maternal language and ethnicity. White-matter volumes in HFA and ASP were compared and each contrasted with controls.

Results

White-matter volumes around the basal ganglia were higher in the HFA group than ASP and higher in both autism groups than controls. Compared with controls, children with HFA had less frontal and corpus callosal white matter in the left hemisphere; those with ASP had less frontal and corpus callosal white matter in the right hemisphere with more white matter in the left parietal lobe.

Conclusions

HFA involved mainly left hemisphere white-matter systems; ASP affected predominantly right hemisphere white-matter systems. The impact of HFA on basal ganglia white matter was greater than ASP. This implies that aetiological factors and management options for autism spectrum disorders may be distinct. History of language acquisition is a potentially valuable marker to refine our search for causes and treatments in autism spectrum.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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