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(Des-Tyr1)-γ-endorphin in the treatment of schizophrenia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

Rahul Manchanda
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Charing Cross Hospital Medical School, London
Steven R. Hirsch
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, Charing Cross Hospital Medical School, London

Synopsis

Inj. (Des-Tyr1)-γ-endorphin was used in a pilot study over a period of 12 days for the treatment of 11 schizophrenics and the assessments were carried out using standardized rating scales. Only 2 patients showed an improvement. Euphoria and excitement were observed in 3 patients. The findings are discussed in contrast to the earlier reports of a dramatic improvement with the compound.

Type
Brief Communication
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1981

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References

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