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Anger and other psychological factors in coronary atherosclerosis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 July 2009

C. C. Tennant*
Affiliation:
Professorial Psychiatric Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards and Developmental Disabilities Centre, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
P. M. Langeluddecke
Affiliation:
Professorial Psychiatric Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards and Developmental Disabilities Centre, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
G. Fulcher
Affiliation:
Professorial Psychiatric Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards and Developmental Disabilities Centre, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
J. Wilby
Affiliation:
Professorial Psychiatric Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards and Developmental Disabilities Centre, Liverpool, NSW, Australia
*Corresponding
1Address for correspondence: A/Professor C. C. Tennant Professorial Psychiatric Unit, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW 2065, Australia

Synopsis

This study of 519 coronary angiography patients failed to replicate our earlier findings in 90 angiography patients (Tennant & Langeluddecke, 1985) which showed that trait tension, trait anxiety and suppression of anger were correlates of atherosclerosis. In the present studya variety of psychological measures, including state and trait anxiety, tension, anger, locus of control and suppression of anger, depression and anxiety, showed no significant association with coronary atherosclerosis as assessed by coronary angiography.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1987

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