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Le cortisol salivaire: une alternative au dosage du cortisol plasmatique

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 April 2020

JP Kahn
Affiliation:
Service de psychologie médicale (Pr M Laxenaire), Centre hospitalier régional de Nancy, hôpital Jeanne-d’Arc, BP 303, 54201Toul Cedex
N de Talance
Affiliation:
Laboratoire d‘explorations fonctionnelles (Pr M Boulange), Centre hospitalier régional de Nancy, hôpital de Brabois, 54500Vandœuvre, France
C Michaux
Affiliation:
INSERM - Unité 308 «Mécanismes de régulation des comportements alimentaires» (Pr JP Nicolas), 38, rue Lionnois, 54000Nancy
P Witkowski
Affiliation:
Service de psychologie médicale (Pr M Laxenaire), Centre hospitalier régional de Nancy, hôpital Jeanne-d’Arc, BP 303, 54201Toul Cedex
C Burlet
Affiliation:
INSERM - Unité 308 «Mécanismes de régulation des comportements alimentaires» (Pr JP Nicolas), 38, rue Lionnois, 54000Nancy
L Mejean
Affiliation:
INSERM - Unité 308 «Mécanismes de régulation des comportements alimentaires» (Pr JP Nicolas), 38, rue Lionnois, 54000Nancy
M Laxenaire
Affiliation:
Service de psychologie médicale (Pr M Laxenaire), Centre hospitalier régional de Nancy, hôpital Jeanne-d’Arc, BP 303, 54201Toul Cedex
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Résumé

L’étude de la fonction hypothalamo-hypophyso-cortico-surrénalienne (HHS) occupe une place de choix dans l’étude du stress, de l’anxiété et d’autres pathologies psychiatriques telle la dépression. Mais les procédures d’investigation actuellement utilisées sont difficiles à mettre en œuvre et susceptibles d’interférer avec les phénomènes étudiés. Les auteurs présentent ici l’adaptation et les applications du dosage du cortisol dans la salive dans diverses conditions statiques et dynamiques chez des patients et des sujets sains qui devraient permettre une approche fructueuse dans l’étude des corrélations clinico-biologiques en psychiatrie et en psychobiologie.

Summary

Summary

The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function has been the focus of interest for many years in an attempt to understand the pathophysiology of stress, anxiety and other psychiatric disorders such as depression. The various procedures which are traditionally used may, however, present several drawbacks: their use is often cumbersome and they may interfere with the variables which are investigated. The authors adapted a radioimmunoassay for salivary cortisol and present its main interests and applications under various static and dynamic conditions in patients and healthy subjects. Direct determination of cortisol in the saliva may prove useful to assist in the future development of research strategies in psychobiology and contribute to a better understanding of the biological correlations and pathophysiology of stress, anxiety and other psychiatric disorders such as depression.

Type
Article original
Copyright
Copyright © European Psychiatric Association 1990

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References

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