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The case for catchment areas for mental health services

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 January 2018

Sonia Johnson
Affiliation:
PRiSM, Institute of Psychiatry, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AZ
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Abstract

The establishment of mental health teams which take responsibility for small geographical catchment areas has been a fundamental element in the planning of community services in most Western European countries over the last decade. This idea is challenged in the companion paper in this issue of Psychiatric Bulletin which refers to catchment areas as a “relic of the past”. The case is put for catchment areas in terms of their planning, service delivery and quality advantages for the development of comprehensive inter-agency mental health services. In brief, it is argued that community mental health services are still in many areas poorly developed (Audit Commission, 1994; Faulkner et al, 1994), and that catchment areas are necessary but not sufficient for their fuller realisation.

Type
Original Papers
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BY
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Copyright
Copyright © Royal College of Psychiatrists, 1995

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