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Virtual Field Trips: Bringing College Students and Policymakers Together through Interactive Technology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2013

Janet M. Box-Steffensmeier
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
J. Tobin Grant
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
Scott R. Meinke
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
Andrew R. Tomlinson
Affiliation:
Ohio State University
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Abstract

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Type
The Teacher
Copyright
Copyright © The American Political Science Association 2000

References

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