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Selegiline in the Treatment of Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2006

Allison Lin
Affiliation:
Clinical Psychopharmacology Research Program, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School; Email: abodkin@mclean.harvard.edu
J. Alexander Bodkin
Affiliation:
Clinical Psychopharmacology Research Program, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School; Email: abodkin@mclean.harvard.edu

Abstract

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Type
Review Article
Copyright
© 2006 Cambridge University Press

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