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Willows in prehistory

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2011

Brian Huntley
Affiliation:
Environmental Research Centre, University of Durham, Department of Biological Sciences, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, U.K.
Jacqueline P. Huntley
Affiliation:
Biological Laboratory, Department of Archaeology, University of Durham, Woodside Building, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE, U.K.
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Synopsis

Palynological and macrofossil evidence of the former presence and abundance of Salix spp. in the British Isles is discussed. The occurrence of Salix remains in archaeological excavations is reviewed. It is concluded that, whereas Salix spp. of shrub and dwarf-shrub habits were abundant during the glacial and late-glacial periods, tall-shrub and tree species have been of only local occurrence during the post-glacial. The wood of these species has been used opportunistically by humans since at least the Neolithic period.

Type
Invited papers
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Society of Edinburgh 1992

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