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Macrofungi associated with British willows

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2011

Roy Watling
Affiliation:
Royal Botanic Garden, Inverleith Row, Edinburgh EH3 5LR, Scotland, U.K.
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Synopsis

The larger fungi associated with British willows are separated into several groups depending on their resource relationship, trophic state and whether associated with dwarf or arborescent species. Over 150 potentially mycorrhizal taxa have been recorded with willows in Britain, with nearly one-third restricted to arborescent communities. The fungi associated with creeping willow form a distinct category probably reflecting former ecological conditions. While some of the necrotrophic and mycorrhizal fungi are restricted to willows, the saprotrophs are often more widespread and exhibit less specificity.

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Invited papers
Copyright
Copyright © Royal Society of Edinburgh 1992

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