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Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to study carbohydrate metabolism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 August 2018

Peter G. Morris
Affiliation:
Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Physics, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD
Dominick J. O. McIntyre
Affiliation:
Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Physics, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD
Ron Coxon
Affiliation:
Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Physics, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD
Herman S. Bachelard
Affiliation:
Magnetic Resonance Centre, Department of Physics, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD
And K. Tim Moriarty
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical School, Queen's Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH
Paul L. Greenhaff
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical School, Queen's Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH
Ian A. MacDonald
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical School, Queen's Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH
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Abstract

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Type
Energy and Protein Metabolism Group Workshop on ‘Application of stable isotopes to nutritional metabolism’
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1994

References

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