Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-22jsc Total loading time: 0.234 Render date: 2021-10-26T16:07:52.046Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Metagenomic and metabolic shift on morbid obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 May 2021

S. Román-Sagüillo
Affiliation:
Instituto Universitario de Biomedicina (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, León, Spain
M.V. García-Mediavilla
Affiliation:
Instituto Universitario de Biomedicina (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, León, Spain Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
M. Juárez-Fernández
Affiliation:
Instituto Universitario de Biomedicina (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, León, Spain
D. Porras
Affiliation:
Instituto Universitario de Biomedicina (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, León, Spain
P. Linares
Affiliation:
Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, León, Spain
M. Ballesteros-Pomar
Affiliation:
Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, Departamento de Endocrinología y Nutrición, León, Spain
A. Urioste-Fondo
Affiliation:
Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, Departamento de Endocrinología y Nutrición, León, Spain
B. Álvarez-Cuenllas
Affiliation:
Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, León, Spain
J. González-Gallego
Affiliation:
Instituto Universitario de Biomedicina (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, León, Spain Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
S. Sánchez-Campos
Affiliation:
Instituto Universitario de Biomedicina (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, León, Spain Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
F. Jorquera
Affiliation:
Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León, Servicio de Aparato Digestivo, León, Spain
E. Nistal
Affiliation:
Instituto Universitario de Biomedicina (IBIOMED), Universidad de León, León, Spain Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2021

Obesity has emerged as one of the major global public health concerns, associated with a significant morbidity and mortality. Obesity clinical management demands increasing efforts for new therapeutic targets and innovative approaches. The link between gut microbiota and obesity has been thoroughly demonstrated, pointing gut microbiota manipulation as a promising tool to address this issue(Reference Abenavoli, Scarpellini and Colica1). Bariatric surgery is a reliable resource to deal with severe cases when other approaches have failed. However, it has been stated that it may have a profound impact on gut microbiota which is still poorly understood(Reference Magouliotis, Tasiopoulou and Sioka2). We aim to characterise the changes in faecal microbiome and metabolome associated with bariatric surgery on morbid obese patients.

Ten patients (20-60 years old) diagnosed with obesity not treated with antibiotics 1 month before the study were recruited by Endocrinology Service of Complejo Asistencial Universitario de León. Fecal samples were collected before and after bariatric surgery and processed for metabolomics and metagenomic analysis. Microbiota composition was identified by 16S rRNA Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Polar metabolites were quantified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to determine short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) concentration. Kruskal-Wallis followed by Wilcoxon test for paired samples allowed identification of varying taxa. Univariant analysis according to fold change and significant Wilcoxon test, and multivariate analysis based on PLS-DA models were employed to estimate differences associated to surgery.

Bacterial communities were modified by bariatric surgery, tending to cluster separately on β-diversity plot based on UniFrac distance, while α-diversity remained unaffected. More remarkable differences were detected at phylum and genus levels. Relative abundance of Tenericutes, Firmicutes, Saccharibacteria (phyla), Coprococcus, Lactococcus and Lachnospira (genera) decreased after surgery while increases in Butyricimonas, Parabacteroides and Slackia were detected. Fecal metabolome composition was deeply modified by bariatric surgery. All predominant SCFAs (acetate, propionate and butyrate) experimented a significant decrease upon surgery (−52.2±15.40%, −46.2±11.92% and −63.5±9.26%, respectively). Moreover, metabolomic analysis highlighted the contribution of a subset of metabolites with a great performance on classifying samples in pre and post-operated. Among these compounds, intermediates of tricarboxylic acids cycle like citrate and malate, amino acids like aminolevulinate and histidine and others like taurine, glyoxylate or choline (all experimenting decreases) highlighted as the ones with larger differences following bariatric surgery, being considered hallmarks of the procedure and a potential fingerprint of weight loss in obese patients.

Bariatric surgery reshapes gut microbiota composition and produces significant alterations in the metabolome which can be related to the metabolic outcomes of the procedure. More studies are needed to understand the role of the microbial and metabolomic fingerprint of bariatric surgery in obesity and weight loss therapies.

Acknowledgements

Supported by BFU2017-87960-R and GRS1888/A/18. CIBERehd is funded by Instituto de Salud Carlos III.

References

Abenavoli, L, Scarpellini, E, Colica, C et al. (2019) Nutrients 11, 2690.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Magouliotis, D, Tasiopoulou, V, Sioka, E et al. (2017) Obes Surg 27, 13451357.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Metagenomic and metabolic shift on morbid obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Metagenomic and metabolic shift on morbid obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Metagenomic and metabolic shift on morbid obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *