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Growth promotion in farm animals

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2007

Peter J. Buttery
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Biochemistry and Food Science, University of Nottingham, School of Agriculture, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, Leics LE12 5RD
Janet M. Dawson
Affiliation:
Department of Applied Biochemistry and Food Science, University of Nottingham, School of Agriculture, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, Leics LE12 5RD
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Abstract

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Type
Symposium on ‘Growth’
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1990

References

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