Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-n7x5d Total loading time: 0.278 Render date: 2021-12-06T19:43:30.755Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Ferulic acid and its derivatives modulate nitric oxide balance in HUVEC cells

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 December 2017

M. Le Sayec
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Research Centre, Life Sciences Department, Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, London, UK
G. Serreli
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Research Centre, Life Sciences Department, Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, London, UK
E. Thou
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Research Centre, Life Sciences Department, Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, London, UK
C. Lacour
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Research Centre, Life Sciences Department, Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, London, UK
J.P.E. Spencer
Affiliation:
Molecular Nutrition Group, School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6AP, UK
G. Corona
Affiliation:
Health Sciences Research Centre, Life Sciences Department, Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, London, UK
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Type
Abstract
Copyright
Copyright © The Authors 2017 

Nitric oxide (NO) is an important vasodilator involved in the regulation of vascular homeostasis, and plays a crucial role in maintaining a normal endothelial function( Reference Leong 1 ). Dietary phenolic acids such as ferulic acid can improve vascular function( Reference Vauzour 2 ), through maintenance of local levels of NO. Thus the molecular events involved are not fully understood( Reference Corona 3 ) and further mechanistic investigations are required. The aim of this study is to understand the precise cellular mechanisms by which ferulic acid and its metabolites maintain healthy vascular function through modulation of the NO pathway.

Primary Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells were exposed to ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, hydroferulic acid, ferulic acid 4-O-glucuronide, isoferulic Acid 3-O-Sulfate and Dihydroferulic acid 4-O-glucuronide (1μM) for 24 h or 2 h. Apocynin and Nω-Nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA) were used as additional controls. Superoxide production, cyclic GMP cGMP) levels, and Akt1 activation were determined. The statistical analysis of the data (at least 4 biological replicates) was conducted by one-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey post-hoc t-test using the Graphpad 7 software.

* = p < 0·05, ** = p < 0·01, *** = p < 0·001 vs. control

Similarly to apocynin, all compounds tested showed the ability to enhance NO levels, measured as production of cGMP, and significantly decrease superoxide production, Protein expression results obtained through western blotting showed that the treatment with ferulic acid, isoferulic acid, hydroferulic acid and isoferulic Acid 3-O-Sulfate was also able to significantly increase Akt1 activation, measured as the ratio of the phosphorylated (Ser 473) / total protein. Our results indicated that all the tested ferulic acid metabolites can modulated NO balance, measured as cGMP production, by decreasing its degradation (via reduced superoxide formation), however the glucuronide-conjugated metabolites are not able to significantly enhance NO production through the Akt1/eNOS pathway.

This work was supported by the BBSRC (BB/M002802/1)

References

1. Leong, XF et al. (2015) Biomed Res Int May (3). 528757.Google Scholar
2. Vauzour, D et al. (2010) Nutrients (2): 11061131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Corona, G, et al. (2014) Nutrition and Aging 2(2–3): 125132.Google Scholar
Figure 0

You have Access
1
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Ferulic acid and its derivatives modulate nitric oxide balance in HUVEC cells
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Ferulic acid and its derivatives modulate nitric oxide balance in HUVEC cells
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Ferulic acid and its derivatives modulate nitric oxide balance in HUVEC cells
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *