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PhD Research Learning in Product Architecture Design

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019

Olga Sankowski*
Affiliation:
Hamburg University of Technology;
Kevin Otto
Affiliation:
Aalto University;
Seung Ki Moon
Affiliation:
Nanyang Technological University
Dieter Krause
Affiliation:
Hamburg University of Technology;
*Corresponding
Contact: Sankowski, Olga, Hamburg University of Technology, Institute of Product Development and Mechanical Engineering Design, Germany, o.sankowski@tuhh.de

Abstract

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The field of design research has been expanding into a wide diverse range of multidisciplinary topics. It takes substantial time for young researchers to attain a cumulative overview of state of the art on ever more complex methodologies. Teaching doctoral candidates in summer schools is an approach being taken by the design society to support them attaining an immersed understanding of a chosen research field as well as to help them formulate their own line of research. The aim for a new researcher is to form exchanges and collaborations with other researchers. The 'International Summer School on Product Architecture Design - PAD 2018' was such an effort, where 17 international PhD researchers and three international faculties met for a week and explored research in product architecture through hands-on exercises. We surveyed the researchers for effectiveness of the summer school and found that structure and concept of the summer school was effective for providing a background baseline of state of the art. We found there was a significant but less impact on individual participant´s research. We have yet to understand if the creation of collaborations among participants will occur.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019

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