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Methodical Approach for Process Selection in Additive Manufacturing

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019

Nadine Wortmann
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Hamburg Produktentwicklung und Konstruktionstechnik;
Christoph Jürgenhake
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Research Institute for Mechatronic Systems Design IEM
Tobias Seidenberg*
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Research Institute for Mechatronic Systems Design IEM
Roman Dumitrescu
Affiliation:
Fraunhofer Research Institute for Mechatronic Systems Design IEM
Dieter Krause
Affiliation:
Technische Universität Hamburg Produktentwicklung und Konstruktionstechnik;
*Corresponding
Contact: Seidenberg, Tobias, Fraunhofer Research Institute for Mechatronic Systems Design IEM, Product Engineering, Germany, tobias.seidenberg@iem.fraunhofer.de

Abstract

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In recent years, rapid technical progress has led to additive manufacturing achieving a high degree of technological maturity that enables a broad range of applications. This is reinforced in particular by the advantages of the technology, such as the production of complex components, smaller quantities and fast reaction times. However, a lack of knowledge of the various process techniques, such as insufficient potential assessment, specific design guidelines or even of process restrictions, often lead to different errors.

This paper presents a methodological approach to support designers in the manufacturing process selection of specific parts at an early stage of product development. In a four-stage procedure, potential part candidates are first identified and part classes formed on the basis of characteristics. Building on this, AM thinking is to be stimulated, for example, with the aid of design guidelines. A comparison between conventionally and additively manufactured parts can be made using a simplified cost model. The results are incorporated into a process model that supports companies in the systematic selection of manufacturing processes.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019

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