Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-cf9d5c678-5tm97 Total loading time: 0.163 Render date: 2021-07-28T22:33:02.984Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Structural, chemical and isotopic examinations of interstellar organic matter extracted from meteorites and interstellar dust particles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2008

Henner Busemann
Affiliation:
Planetary and Space Sciences Research Institute, The Open University, U. K. email: h.busemann@open.ac.uk
Conel M. O'D. Alexander
Affiliation:
Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington
Larry R. Nittler
Affiliation:
Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington
Rhonda M. Stroud
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory Washington
Tom J. Zega
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory Washington
George D. Cody
Affiliation:
Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington
Hikaru Yabuta
Affiliation:
Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington
A.L. David Kilcoyne
Affiliation:
Chemical Science Division, Berkeley National Laboratory
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Abstract

Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust Particles (IDPs) are supposed to originate from asteroids and comets, sampling the most primitive bodies in the Solar System. They contain abundant carbonaceous material. Some of this, mostly insoluble organic matter (IOM), likely originated in the protosolar molecular cloud, based on spectral properties and H and N isotope characteristics. Together with cometary material returned with the Stardust mission, these samples provide a benchmark for models aiming to understand organic chemistry in the interstellar medium, as well as for mechanisms that secured the survival of these fragile molecules during Solar System formation. The carrier molecules of the isotope anomalies are largely unknown, although amorphous carbonaceous spheres, so-called nanoglobules, have been identified as carriers. We are using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry to identify isotopically anomalous material in meteoritic IOM and IDPs at a ~100-200 nm scale. Organics of most likely interstellar origin are then extracted with the Focused-Ion-Beam technique and prepared for synchrotron X-ray and Transmission Electron Microscopy. These experiments yield information on the character of the H- and N-bearing interstellar molecules: While the association of H and N isotope anomalies with nanoglobules could be confirmed, we have also identified amorphous, micron-sized monolithic grains. D-enrichments in meteoritic IOM appear not to be systematically associated with any specific functional groups, whereas 15N-rich material can be related to imine and nitrile functionality. The large 15N- enrichments observed here (δ15N > 1000 ‰) cannot be reconciled with models using interstellar ammonia ice reactions, and hence, provide new constraints for understanding the chemistry in cold interstellar clouds.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2008
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Structural, chemical and isotopic examinations of interstellar organic matter extracted from meteorites and interstellar dust particles
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Structural, chemical and isotopic examinations of interstellar organic matter extracted from meteorites and interstellar dust particles
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Structural, chemical and isotopic examinations of interstellar organic matter extracted from meteorites and interstellar dust particles
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *