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Statistical challenges in weak lensing cosmology

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2015

Masahiro Takada*
Affiliation:
Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8583, Japan email: masahiro.takada@ipmu.jp
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Abstract

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Cosmological weak lensing is the powerful probe of cosmology. Here we address one of the most fundamental, statistical questions inherent in weak lensing cosmology: whether or not we can recover the initial Gaussian information content of large-scale structure by combining the weak lensing observables, here focused on the weak lensing power spectrum and bispectrum. To address this question we fully take into account correlations between the power spectra of different multipoles and the bispectra of different triangle configurations, measured from a finite area survey. In particular we show that super-survey modes whose length scale is larger than or comparable with the survey size cause significant sample variance in the weak lensing correlations via the mode-coupling with sub-survey modes due to nonlinear gravitational clustering – the so-called super-sample variance. In this paper we discuss the origin of the super-sample variance and then study the information content inherent in the weak lensing correlation functions up to three-point level.

Type
Contributed Papers
Copyright
Copyright © International Astronomical Union 2015 

References

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